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Irish Genealogical Society International

Search in Ireland - Links

Please note that the links in this section are specific to the Search in Ireland topic.

There is information and links for Irish civil records, church records, land records, wills, graveyards and more. This section is a toolkit that includes some of the most used record links all in one place.  There are some suggested Irish specialty websites and articles.  Make sure you also refer to the More Help section for even more links. 

TIP:  If you are searching for a word or phrase in a document or on a web page, hold down the Control (ctrl) key and f key at the same time.  A box will pop-up to enter the word or phrase.  The shortcut on Apple computers is Command f key at the same time.  

  • Websites and Articles of Interest
    • The Septs January 2020, Volume 41, Number 1 – The theme of this edition is Key Websites in Depth.  This journal issue is a great resource about Irish collections on various websites.    Access to prior editions of the journal are only available to members on the IGSI website.  Past issues by year are accessed through the “Content” link or you can search for a topic from the “Issues by Theme” link.
    • Irish Genealogical Society International – A paid membership to the society offers a wealth of information for those researching their Irish ancestors.  The Septs journal is a benefit for members only.  Issues from June 1980 are available online to IGSI members.  Other member benefits include discounts on webinars and the Ginealas eNewsletter which is available from December 2008.
    • Roots Ireland.ie – This is a paid subscription, which also includes options for a month or day access.  The database has birth, marriage, death, gravestone inscriptions, Griffith’s Valuation, Irish ship passenger lists and census substitutes.  Make sure the area and time frame that you are researching is included on the site.  Not covered are County Kerry, southwest Cork, parts of Carlow, and Dublin city which are covered by IrishGenealogy.ie.
    • FindMyPast – This is a paid subscription but a free 2 week trial is available.  Here is the link for their free collections:  FindMyPast Free Collections – Note you will need to register.  Included for free:  Roman Catholic Parish Baptisms, newspapers, vital records, US and Canadian census records, travel and migration records and Irish family history records.
    • ScotlandsPeople – This is a fee based site.   Perhaps you have ancestors from Scotland that emigrated to Ireland or Ireland to Scotland.  You can search the indexes for free, maps, Kirk Sessions, and the transcribed version of the 1881 census which is also on FamilySearch.org.  The Articles of Interest section has a detailed article about using the site.
    • Irish Ancestors – This is John Grenham’s paid subscription site but the Browse section is free.   Included in the Browse area is a wealth of information based on his book, Tracing Your Irish Ancestors, 5E.  In other areas of the website, “There are five free page-views per day and then a subscription is required.”  See his YouTube channel which is listed in this section which includes videos on using his site.
    • Public Record Office of Northern IrelandPRONI is the official archive for Northern Ireland located in Belfast.  PRONI holds documents covering a period from 1600 to the present day.  PRONI has free access to collections such as the Ulster Covenant, Valuation Revision Books and Will Calendars.
    • National Archives of Ireland Genealogy –National Archives of Ireland has developed a genealogy section that facilitates, “access to digitised collections that are useful to family and local history research. Access to these records is free of charge.”  This link is for the list of collections and links to the records.
    • National Archives of the UK – All of Ireland was part of the UK from 1801-1921 and include Irish records in the UK Archives.  There are over 190 resource guides for family history and the Discovery catalogue should be searched for digitized material.  Since Northern Ireland remains part of the UK, recent resources can be found for the counties Antrim, Armagh, Down, Fermanagh, Londonderry and Tyrone.
    • National Library of Ireland – The Catalogues and Database tabs lists the collections that are searchable online, such as the Newspaper Database.  Explore the tiles in the library by surname, subject, etc.  The Services tab indicates, “The National Library of Ireland offers a number of services to its users. These include a reference enquiry service, provision of advice to those engaging in family history research and a range of copying services”.
    • GENUKI  – GENUKI is the acronym for Genealogy United Kingdom and Ireland.  “GENUKI provides a virtual reference library of genealogical information of particular relevance to the UK and Ireland.”  This is a must use site and there is a tremendous amount of helpful resources including gazetteers, directories, archives and libraries, etc.
    • FamilySearch.org Wiki Ireland – This is a great free resource which includes “How to Guides”, information by county, resources on other genealogy websites, various records such as directories, immigration and school records, and much more.
    • The Registry of Deeds Index Project – This is an amazing ongoing volunteer indexing project of the more than 2,000 volumes of recorded “memorials” (detailed abstracts) of deeds, conveyances, and wills spanning more than 200 years.  There are more than half million index entries, which also includes grantees.  The entries have a direct link to the document on FamilySearch.org.  Read this article on using the index at http://jennyalogy.blogspot.com/2021/06/the-registry-of-deeds-in-ireland.html.
    • Duchas.ie – The collections include The School Collection which is, “A collection of folklore compiled by schoolchildren in Ireland in the 1930.”  Under the “Collections” tab, click on “The School Collection”, and explore this wonderful collection by topic.  There is also a photo collection and a manuscript collection. 
    • Irish Genealogy Toolkit – Claire Santry’s site includes genealogy information, tools and a wealth of great information.  “No matter where in the world you now call home – whether it be the Canadian Rockies, the Australian Outback, one of the world's great emerald cities such as Liverpool (UK) or Boston (USA), or the beautiful craggy coast of Donegal – you'll find page after page of relevant advice on this website plus the very latest information on genealogical resources in Ireland.”  See the Bookshelf section for her helpful book.
    • The IrelandGen Web Project – This is a volunteer project for the Republic of Ireland.  It is an “Irish resources website with information regarding all the counties in Republic of Ireland”.  Included are links, records and resources for each county.   See below for the Northern Ireland Gen Web Project.  Note, there is also a link to the Scotland GenWeb Project on the site.
    • Northern Ireland World GenWeb – The free site has resources, records, and links for Antrim, Armagh, Derry, Down, Fermanagh and Tyrone.  Included are resources, records and links for the Republic of Ireland.
    • Ireland Reaching Out – Join this wonderful free site which also calls itself Ireland XO.  Get free genealogical advice from their Irish based volunteer network, there are online profiles that members have posted of their ancestors, pictures of building in every county as well as helpful articles. 
    • Ireland Genealogy Projects – “We are completely free to use. The site contains County Pages (County Information) and Archives pages (Transcriptions & Headstones). The website is divided into two sections. The County side has Research Aids & Links. The Archives side has transcribed documents and headstones.”
       
  • Irish Placenames

    • Make sure you have read the Irish Jurisdictions –Irish Places article on the Search in Ireland introduction page.
    • The Septs July 2021, Volume 42, Number 3 – The theme of this edition is titled Place.  Some of the articles include Irish Administrative Divisions and the helpful article, Resources for Irish Research.  Access to prior editions of the journal are only available to IGSI logged in members. 
    • Townlands in Ireland - Included is the pronunciation of the Irish townland names, maps and area.  There is a list with the direction of bordering townlands, which is very helpful to know when using Griffith’s maps and trying to find the townland on the map. At the bottom of the townland page is a link to the OpenStreetMap website.
    • Logainm.ie – This is a placenames database of Ireland.  Included is a pronunciation of the placename, mapping tools and names in English and Irish.
    • The Irish Ancestral Research Association Maps & Geography – TIARA has a page with an extensive list of maps with links.  For example, there is a map of Ireland in 1808 and Ireland’s history in maps.
    • Irish Ancestors Poor Law Union Map – This is a map on John Grenham’s website of a map of Poor Law Unions, “AKA Superintendent Registrar’s Districts used for official registration of births, marriage and deaths.”  Click on the Poor Law Union to then see the Civil Parishes and Townlands within each Poor Law Union.
    • Irish Ancestors Placenames – This is in John Grenham’s free browse section.  A great tool is the ability to use wildcards (*).  For each townland, it will list the County, Civil Parish, Poor Law Union, and Registrar’s District.  On the left are links for the Civil Parish maps, Roman Catholic maps and Poor Law Union Maps.
    • Townland Index and Database 1851 – Shane Wilson has created a free database of the index that was published in 1861 following the Ordnance survey which used the 1851 census information.  The benefit of this site is that you can use wildcards for single or multiple letters in searching for a townland.  Note, this site includes many other additional resources.
  • Church Records
    • Roman Catholic Records at the National Library of Ireland – Birth, marriage, and death records are on this site.  There is not a searchable index and it is a collection you can browse.  FindMyPast.com and Ancestry.com include indexes and images.  Ancestry has a small number of parishes where the images are in color.
    • Public Record Office of Northern Ireland Church Records  – The church records are on microfilm and the good news is that they are digitizing additional registers across Northern Ireland.  These can be access through their catalogue within the archive’s public search room.  The PRONI Guide to Church Records is over 350 pages and has a wealth of information and includes the entire province of Ulster.  In addition to Northern Ireland, it includes records from Donegal, Monaghan, Cavan and some parishes in Louth.  There is also a separate guide for Church Records Available as Digital Copies and this guide is on the same page as the PRONI Guide to Church Record.
    • Irish Ancestors Roman Catholic Maps – This wonderful tool is part of John Grenham’s Browse collection and is free.  You can select the county and then the Catholic parish.  Note, Catholic parishes are different than civil parishes.  Once selected, there is a summary of the dates of each type of record that is available and where the records are found. 
    • Family Search Latin Word List – This is a helpful list, especially when searching using the first name in the search criteria for Catholic records.  Did you know that Hibernian is Latin for Ireland?
    • Anglican Representative Church Body Library – Click on the “About” tab and then “Genealogy”.  There are small number of parish registers that have been digitized.  In addition it lists an email address for inquires.  The List of Church of Ireland Parish Registers – This pdf document can be downloaded and is a color-coded resource and indicates records held in:  the Representative Church Body Library, PRONI, those lost in the 1922 fire, National Archives Ireland and those that are in the local parishes. 
    • National Archives of Ireland Diocesan and Prerogative Marriage Licenses Bond Index 1623-1866 – The search feature is on the right side of the page.   “Marriage licenses were granted, on payment of a fee, by the ecclesiastical courts of the Church of Ireland. These indexes, which survived the Public Record Office explosion of 1922, are a rare source of early records. They record Protestant marriages going as far back as 1623.”  The index is also on FindMyPast.com.  
    • Presbyterian Historical Society of Ireland – This is the Presbyterian library and archive.  There is information on individual manuscripts; congregational records, including a guide, Presbytery minutes, etc.  Under the “Web Resources” tab is a history of congregations, documents and student lists, etc.  Records are either at the local church, PRONI (Northern Ireland), or the Presbyterian Historical Society of Ireland.
    • Methodist Historical Society of Ireland – Under the “Collections” tab are catalogues and research tools.  The “Collections” tab includes an index of Irish Methodist Churches.  The “Genealogy” tab includes information on cemeteries and Methodist baptismal and marriage records.
    • Quakers in Ireland - This is the “Official website of The Religious Society of Friends in Ireland”.  Included are “Quaker Links” and “Library” information.  Under the library tab, it indicates that, “The most important manuscripts are the Minutes of the various Quaker meetings and committees. These and many other documents from 1670 to 1914 may also be viewed on FindmyPast.com.”
  • Civil Records
  • IrishGenealogy.ie Civil Records – Civil registration records were created by the government starting in 1845 for non-Catholic marriages and non-denominational civil marriages performed by state appointed registrars, and in 1864 for births, all marriages and deaths.  The site covers all of Ireland up to the partition in 1922.  The Church Records tab covers Roman Catholic Church records for County Kerry, Dublin and much of County Cork but refer to the website for details.  Indexes are available on FamilySearch.org, Ancestry.com, Roots Ireland.ie and FindMyPast.com.
  • General Register Office of Northern Ireland – Civil registration records in the six counties of Northern Ireland including instructions for using GRONI and costs are on the site. 
  • The National Archives of Ireland Census 1901 and 1911 – This landing page has information about the censuses and the link to the search forms.  Be sure that you click on the “Show all Information” at the top right to see additional information in the Household Form A.  If you are not finding someone that should be in the census, search on Ancestry.com or Findmypast.com and take advantage of their greater search capability by adding names of members of the house and searching with wildcards (asterisk *).
  • The National Archives of Ireland Pre-1901 Census Fragments – “Fragments survive for 1821 – 1851 for some counties, as follows:  Antrim, 1851; Belfast city (one ward only), 1851; Cavan, 1821 and 1841; Cork, 1841; Dublin city (index to heads of household only), 1851; Fermanagh, 1821, 1841 and 1851; Galway, 1813 (numerical returns for Longford barony) and 1821; King’s County (Offaly), 1821; Londonderry (Derry), 1831 – 34; Meath, 1821 and Waterford, 1841.”
  • National Archives of Ireland - Census Search Forms, 1841 and 1851 – “The government used these forms to search the 1841 & 1851 Census to prove the age of people applying for the Old Age Pension Act 1908, when birth certificates did not exist because the person was born before Civil Registration had begun.”  They are free for the Republic of Ireland and include the images.  They are also available at FamilySearch.org and FindMyPast.com.  Northern Ireland records are at the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) are on microfilm in the self-service microfilm room.
  • FamilySearch.org Wiki Ireland Census Substitutes – There is a comprehensive list of records of census substitutions.  Here are several census substitutes that are on the Wiki list.
  • 1641 Depositions– These records are witness testimonies, mainly Protestant, some Catholic, concerning their experiences in the 1641 Irish Rebellion.  There is historical information on this Trinity College Library Dublin website.
  • The Down Survey 1656 - 1658 – This site is packed with information and is on the Trinity College Dublin website.  The Down Survey is a mapped survey.  There is historical information about the transfer of land from Irish Catholics to English Protestants.  Included are Down Survey Maps and on the Historical GIS tab, you can search “Landowners by Name” and “Ownership by Religion and is easy to use.  It you click on the “About This Website”, there is the historical context of the 1641 rebellion and the conquest by Cromwell. 
 
  • Land and Tax Records
    • Ask About Ireland Griffith’s Valuation – This a free site. The purpose of the valuation was for levying tax on property. “The Primary Valuation was the first full-scale valuation of property in Ireland.  It was overseen by Richard Griffin and published between 1847 and 1864.  It is one of the most important surviving 19th century genealogical sources.”  Note that after entering a search, the results page has a column labeled “Details”.  Clicking on the Details icon, a partial transcription displays and it includes the date the valuation record was printed.   You will also want to click on the Original Page icon to display the full page.  On Ancestry.com ($) and FindMyPast.com ($), the collection is titled, Ireland, Griffith’s Valuation, 1847-1864, which includes images but not the maps. 
    • Ask About Ireland Guide to Griffith’s Valuation Maps – This is a guide for using the maps for Griffith’s Valuation. There are two short videos in the Video section about using Griffith’s.
    • National Archives of Ireland Valuation Office Books 1824 – 1856 – Office books are the underlying information to Griffith’s Valuation.  “The valuation work was carried out by professional valuators...” and these records are the appraisers’ notebooks.  Searchable by name are Field Books, House Books, Tenure Books and Quatro Books.  For example, the House Books has information about the houses and buildings.
    • Northern Ireland Valuation Revision Books – This is a free online database of high quality scans of the Valuation Revision Boks for Amagh, Antrim, Down, Fermanagh, Londonderry and Tyronne.  After Griffith’s Valuation, properties were valued annually.  Each year, changes were recorded to the name of occupiers or immediate lessors, quality or dimensions of the property.
    • The Valuation Office of the Republic of Ireland – Revision Books or Cancelled Land Books for the Republic of Ireland are only available at the Land Valuation Office in Dublin.  Many of the counties have been digitized and are currently only available at the Valuation Office.  The website has a list of the counties.
    • National Archives of Ireland Tithe Applotment Books – “The Tithe Applotment Books are a vital source for genealogical research for the pre-Famine period, given the loss of the 1821-51 Census records. They were compiled between 1823 and 1837 in order to determine the amount which occupiers of agricultural holdings over one acre should pay in tithes to the Church of Ireland (the main Protestant church and the church established by the State until its dis-establishment in 1871).”
    • FindMyPast.com - The 1831 Tithe Defaulters – ($) In 1831 the Tithe Defaulters List produced 29,000 names.  The index “is a unique record of these people at the time that the various Schedules were compiled, namely, in June, July and August, 1832. Since the 1831 census was almost completely destroyed in 1922, this is a doubly important source for these areas.” 
    • National Archives of Ireland Irish Landed Estates – Records of leases and purchases are found in surviving estate papers which can only be viewed in person.  Collection are also at the National Library of Ireland and the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland and can only be viewed in person.  Online the records have been digitized and are available on Ancestry.com’s ($) collection which is titled Ireland, Encumbered Estates 1850-1885.  The FindMyPast.com ($) collection is Landed Estates Court Rentals 1850-1885. 
    • The Down Survey of Ireland – An important land resource the Down Survey was orders by Oliver Cromwell and was the first attempt to survey Ireland which was conducted from 1655-1658.  Even if you have not traced your Irish ancestors back to the mid-1600s, this is a fascinating site.  Created by Trinity College Dublin, the site includes historical context and maps.  On the “Historical GIS” tab, you can search by landowner by name, ownership by religion and the distribution of murders in the 1841 rebellion.
    • Fáilte Romhat Land Owners in Ireland 1876 – “Land Owners in Ireland by county in alphabetical order. The names and address of every land owner in Ireland 1876 who had at least one acre of land. Click on the link in the results to see the original page.”
       
  • Wills, Probate Records and Court Records
    • National Archives of Ireland Calendar of Wills and Administrations 1858-1922 – “Up to 1917, the Calendars cover the whole of Ireland, but since 1918 they cover only the 26 counties in the Republic”.  The collection includes images.  Indexes covering the six counties of Northern Ireland since 1918 are in the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI). The Calendars of Wills and Administrations for Armagh, Belfast and Londonderry are searchable online at www.proni.gov.uk/index/search_the_archives/will_calendars/wills_search.  The FindMyPast.com ($) collection is Ireland Calendars of Wills & Administrations 1858-1920.  The Ancestry.com ($) collection is Ireland, Calendar of Wills and Administrations, 1858-1920 and Northern Ireland, Will Calendar Index, 1858-1965.
    • National Archives of Ireland Prerogative and Diocesan of Some Wills and Copies of Others 1596-1858 – More details about this collection are on the website.  FindMyPast.com’s ($) collection is Ireland Diocesan and Prerogative Wills and Administrations Indexes 1595-1858.  “Did your Irish ancestor leave a will when they died before 1858?  If they did it would have been proved before one of the ecclesiastical courts of the establishment Church of Ireland. These handwritten indexes and will books can give you your ancestor’s name and their occupation, and even details of what they left in their will and to whom.”  Ancestry.com’s ($) collection is Ireland, Index to the Prerogative Wills, 1536-1810.
    • National Archives of Ireland Will Registers 1858-1900 – In this collection are “copies of wills proved in District Registries from 1858 on, survive in Will Registers, and are an exact replacement for the originals which were lost, except of course for the original signatures of the testator and witnesses. Unfortunately, no such copies survive for the Principal Registry, which means there is very little for people who died in Dublin or had particularly large estates. The Registers for Armagh, Belfast and Londonderry are held in the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland.” FindMyPast.com’s ($) collection is Index of Irish Wills 1484-1858 and Ireland Original Will Registers 1858-1920.  
    • National Archives of Ireland Catholic Qualification and Convert Rolls 1700-1845 – “Throughout the eighteenth century, restrictions enacted by the Penal Laws were relaxed for those Catholics who took the Oath of Allegiance to the King (in the local court) and renounced their religion for that of the established Church of Ireland. In the majority of cases this was not a sincere renunciation of the Catholic religion, as it was the only legal means whereby a Catholic could obtain basic civil rights.”  Both FamilySearch.org and FindMyPast.com’s ($) collection is titled Ireland, Catholic Qualification & convert Rolls 1701-1845.  Ancestry.com’s ($) collection is Ireland, Catholic Qualification and convert Rolls, 1701-1845. 
    • FindMyPast.com Ireland Petty Sessions Court Registers – ($) This collection is from 1828 to 1912 for the 26 southern counties.  This is an amazing collection of digital images includes information on criminals, victims and witnesses.  “The Petty Sessions were the lowest courts hearing cases about money owing, domestic disputes and public order offences.”
  • Newspapers
    • FindMyPast Free Newspaper Collection – In partnership with the British Library over a million pages are free to search on FindMyPast.com.
    • British Newspaper Archive – This is a paid site and offers a 7 day free trial available.  This collection is also available on FindMyPast.com with a subscription.
    • Ancestry.com – ($) Ancestry.com’s paid subscription includes their newspaper collection is from 1763- 1890.
    • AmericanAncestors Boston Pilot Irish Immigrant Advertisements – The Boston Pilot Irish Immigrant Advertisements database is one of the free collections on this site.    This collection is also available on Ancestry.com.
    • Ireland Old NewsThis a free site.  There are links by county that, “will take you to the articles currently on our site and organized by county of publication, year and month. These pages are updated frequently so be sure to check back often for your particular interests. Counties Carlow. Laois, Longford, Westmeath and Wexford are not represented.”
    • TroveThere are free digitized collections, including newspapers from the National Library of Australia.
  • Headstones and Burial Records
    • Tip:  Do a Google search for graveyard photos and headstone transcriptions for the county you are researching.
    • Irish Ancestors – The free browse section of John Grenham’s website has a list of cemeteries for each county which includes where there are headstone transcription or where the burial registers can be obtained. 
    • Ireland Genealogy Projects – “We are completely free to use. The site contains County Pages (County Information) and Archives pages (Transcriptions & Headstones). The website is divided into two sections. The County side has Research Aids & Links. The Archives side has transcribed documents and headstones.”
    • Historic Graves – This is a “grassroots community focused heritage project”.  The sites includes maps of local graveyards and photos of every grave and it amazingly includes deciphered inscriptions on each headstone.  In addition, there are audio and video stories recorded by people with local knowledge of the graveyard. 
    • From Ireland.net – “This page features 70,000 free Irish gravestone records referencing hundreds of Irish graveyards, spanning all 32 counties, and compiled and transcribed by Dr. Jane Lyons.”  Notice that there is a link for photos and another for gravestone transcriptions.
    • Dublin Cemetery Trust – This is a pay-per-view site.  The registers go back to 1828 and many people would have been born in the 1700s. 
    • Belfast City – This is a pay-per-view site.  “Look up records in Belfast from 1869 onwards using our burial record search facility. You can buy images of burial records that are over 75 years ...”
    • Mount St Lawrence Burial Ground – This graveyard is in Limerick.  There is also a link on this site to a Burial Register Transcriptions and a video.
    • Find a Grave – If you have names of cemeteries in the area of where your ancestors were from, you can search not only by name, but the name of the cemetery.
    • BillionGraves –“BillionGraves is the world's largest resource for searchable GPS cemetery data.”
    • FindMyPast.com – ($) If you have a subscription, make sure you take a look at cemetery records.
       
  • Additional Resources
    • Fáilte Romhat Irish Flax Growers 1796 – “The Irish Linen Board published a list of nearly 60,000 individuals in 1796.  Spinning wheels were awarded based on the number of acres planted. People who planted one acre were awarded 4 spinning wheels and those growing 5 acres were awarded a loom.”  It is, “also known as the Spinning Wheel list or the Flax Growers Bounty.”  Searches can be done by either county or surname.
    • FamilySearch Ireland Prison Registers 1798-1928 – This collection includes records detailed in prison registers.  The information contained in each record may vary considerably depending on the prison and date, the index contains the prisoner's given name and surname, and potentially their age and birthplace.  Ancestry.com’s ($) collection is titled Ireland Prison Registers, 1790-1924.  FindMyPast.com’s ($) record set is Irish Prison Registers 1790-1924.
    • FamilySearch.org Ireland Poverty Relief Loans 1810-1887 – This record set comprises records of loans provided to the industrious poor in Ireland.  There was a severe famine in early 1820’s and funds were collected to distribute to victims of poverty.  On Ancestry.com ($), the collection is titled Ireland, Sustainability Loan Fund 1812-1868.  FindMyPast’s ($) collection is titled Ireland, Poverty Relief Loans 1821-1874.
    • Ancestry.com Poor Law Union Removals from England 1859-1860 – ($) This collection “comprises records from a volume detailing the names of heads of families sent back to Ireland from England as a result of Poor Law Removal orders in 1859-1860.”
    • Ancestry.com Poor Law and Board of Guardians Records, 1839-1920  – ($) The collection is indexed and includes digitized images.  There are two record sets comprising of Poor Law and Board of Guardian Minutes and Workhouse Admission and Discharge.  “This collection includes workhouse records relating to the North Dublin Union, South Dublin Union, and Rathdown Union (part of counties Dublin and Wicklow). It also includes records relating to Balrothery Union (part of county Dublin), Bawnboy Union (part of county Cavan), and Dromore West Union.” 
    • FindMyPast.com Workhouse and Poor Law in Institutes and Organizations – ($) The collection includes transcripts and original records currently for counties Clare, Dublin, Donegal and Dublin.
    • FindMyPast.com Dog Licenses – ($) The collection will help determine where your ancestor lived at a point in time.  If you are lucky, some entries include the dog’s name.
    • FamilySearch.org Wiki Article on Ireland Military –There is an extensive list of where to find military records in databases such as Ancestry.com ($) and FindMyPast.com ($).  Soldiers’ Wills 1914 – 1917 are on The National Archives of Ireland.   
    • Genealogy Branches Irish Passenger Lists to America – The site has links, finding aids and a book list for Irish Immigration Resources.  Use the card catalog on FamilySearch.org, Ancestry.com ($) and FindMyPast.com ($). Be sure to check inbound and outbound collections.
    • Ancestry.com Ireland, Irish Emigration List, 1833-1839 – ($) “This collection contains an index for residents of County Antrim or County Derry-Londonderry in Northern Ireland who emigrated between 1833 and 1839. The records in this collection were compiled from notebooks kept during the Ordnance Survey of Ireland and are organised by county, church parish, and last name.”
    • Irish Identity – This is a free interesting website.  It includes information about family surnames and origins, the great clans of Ireland, heritage and culture.
    • Library of Ireland - A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland – Samuel Lewis’ 1837 Topographical Dictionary of Ireland is online and searchable by county or townlands.  For example, county searches include information about climate, agriculture, manufacturers and rivers. 
    • FamilySearch Wiki Irish Personal Names – “Understanding customs used in surnames and given names can help you identify your ancestors in records. Learn to recognize name variations and see clues in names.”  This article includes traditional Irish nameing patterns.
    • Dictionary of Irish Biography – This is a free online source that you can search by name or browse.  “The Dictionary of Irish Biography (DIB) is a project of the Royal Irish Academy.  It tells the island’s life story through the biographies, at home and overseas, of prominent men and women born in Ireland, north and south, and the noteworthy Irish careers of those born outside Ireland.”
    • Cyndi’s List Irish Genealogy – Take advantage of the many links for Irish genealogy sites on Cyndi’s list.
    • Library of Ireland Irish Names – There are links to digitized books on this page for “traditional Irish names, with their origins and meanings, and a guide to finding information on 1000s of other forenames, surnames and clans of Ireland.” 
    • University College Cork Atlas of Family Names in Ireland – This atlas includes maps of common surnames from the 1659 census alongside a map of the surname in Griffith’s.
    • ThoughtCo. The 50 Most Common Irish Surnames – “Many of these early Irish surnames began as patronyms to identify a son separately from his father or a grandson from his grandfather. This is why it is very common to see prefixes attached to Irish surnames. Mac, sometimes written Mc, is the Gaelic word for "son" and was attached to the father's name or trade. O is a word all by itself, signifying "grandson" when attached to a grandfather's name or trade.”
       
  • Articles of Interest
    • Ireland Reaching Out: The Irish Flax Growers 1796 Database – “The Spinning Wheel Survey or the Flax Growers List provides the names of almost 60,000 flax growers across Ireland who were incentivised to grow the crop by the Irish Linen Board. The northern counties of Tyrone and Donegal had the largest number of spinning wheels awarded.”
    • Return of Persons to whom Licenses have been granted to keep Arms by Magistrates at Quarter Session in Ireland, 1832 – This the full text on Internet Archive which lists by county the Return of Persons to whom Licenses have been granted to keep Arms by Magistrates at Quarter Session.
    • FamilySearch.org Wiki Irish Genealogical Collections by County – David Rencher of FamilySearch.org has created a list of Irish genealogies by county and the location of the collections.
    • The Family History Guide to Ireland Research and Records – This is an Irish research course by FamilySearch.  Unit A – Get Started with Irish research; B – Go Deeper into Irish research; and C – Explore Irish names.  The county links at the bottom of the page will take you to the FamilySearch Wiki for the county.
    • Irish Lives Remembered Magazine – Irish Family History Centre’s free digital magazine Irish Lives Remembered is dedicated to helping you trace your Irish ancestors. Packed with over 70 pages of Irish Genealogy resources, with something for everyone.” Sign up to receive your free download copy and you can view past issues online.
    • FamilySearch Blog Tracing Irish Americans – “Follow these steps to experience the luck of the Irish and discover your Irish roots.”
    • FamilyTree Magazine How to Search ScotlandsPeople – For those who may have Scots Irish ancestors, this is a detailed article on how to search ScotlandsPeople.  It includes information on what documents are for a fee and what indexes you can search for free.
    • Family Tree Magazine Explaining Scotch, Scottish and Scots-Irish – “The term Scotch-Irish, though common in the United States, is all but unknown in England, Scotland and Ireland.”  The origins of the term Scots-Irish are explained in this article.
    • National Archives of Ireland Census Search Forms 1841 and 1851 –This article explains the Old Age Pension Act of 1908, the requirements, and where the records are.
    • Irish Family Roots Irish County Links – Donna Moughty advises, “The links on this page will give you a starting point to delve into the locality where your ancestor lived.  Many are collections of links for a particular County and some sites have separate pages for each County.”
    • Ireland Reaching Out Old Irish First Names for Boys and Aliases – “Got a lot of background information on an ancestor, but struggling to find them on vital records searches? Know exactly where an individual lived and died in Ireland, yet no death or census record can be found?  Could it possibly be that Irish first name of theirs?”  Note, towards the bottom of the article is a link for a dedicated “Irish Nicknames” Message Board thread to post your query.  Also at the bottom of the article are links to the following articles:  Irish Naming and Baptism Traditions, Irish Surnames 101 and Gaelic Irish Boy’s Names and Aliases.
    • Ireland Reaching Out Old Irish Names for Girls and Aliases – “Perplexed by how your ancestor could have so many aliases? Our unique index to those elusive old girls' Irish names is particularly useful where an individual does not appear on record as expected.”  The index guide in this article is an alphabetized list by the original Gaelic, followed by the Latin name, English name and nicknames. 
    • The Ancient Order of Hibernians The Irish Holocaust  – This article is about the famine.  It includes a map with the literacy rates in Ireland in the 1840’s with Dublin having the highest rate of 54% and Mayo with the lowest at 13%.
       
  • Blogs and Podcasts
    Blogs and podcasts are a valuable tool in staying informed about new record sets and research strategies. Here are some suggestions.
    • Blogs
      • Irish Genealogical Society International Blog – The IGSI blog is a wonderful source of genealogy information.  There are over 1600 posts that have been made over the last 10 plus years.  There is the ability to search by categories such as general interest, online sources, Irish resources and search by timeframe. 
      • Ancestor Network Blog – There are some great posts on this blog.  Some of Dr. Jim Ryan’s notes from his lectures are “Irish Church Records”, “Rentals as a Source for Irish History” and “Catholic Church Records”.  There are some estate records on this blog that are not available elsewhere.  Do not miss the post, “Eye-witnesses to our ancestors:  Travellers’ Writings”.
      • FindMyPast Blog – You do not need a subscription to take advantage of this informative blog.  There are research tools such as Google search techniques, understanding census records and historic information. 
      • Scottish Genes – Chris Paton is originally from Northern Ireland but has both Irish and Scottish Roots.  He posts are about both Ireland and Scotland and news in the genealogy world.  This blog is a great way to keep up with new or updated record collections on genealogy websites and online events.
      • Irish Roots Magazine Blog – While there has not been a new post since late 2019, do not miss some of the excellent articles in the blog. 
      • Free Irish Genealogy eBooks – “The availability of FREE eBooks and eJournals on the internet seems to be growing by the day. These pages list (with links to open the books) about 4,000 free Books and Journals on the topic of Irish, Irish-American, Irish-Australian and Irish-Canadian Genealogy which can all be read online -  most of them can also be downloaded to a reading device such as Kindle, iPad, Tablet, etc. (check the host site for available formats).”  You can “Follow” at the bottom of the page and receive notification of updates.
      • Irish Ancestors Blog – Some of John Grenham’s posts include the free features on his website johngrenham.com.  Interesting posts include “How Gaelic Surnames Were Englished” and “Beware Mr. Smarty-Pants Database”, which includes a link to his YouTube video.
      • A Letter From Ireland – Once a week, Mike Collins from County Cork, writes an interest article.  On the “Articles” tab you can search by topics such as, Irish Surnames, Irish Placenames, Irish Culture and Customs, etc.  The site also includes podcasts.
      • Irish Genealogy News – Keep up with the latest genealogy development with Claire Santry’s blog.  Posts include updates to genealogy collections, DNA test kit sales, membership sales and Irish specific news.
      • The Journey Home Blog - Dwight Radford is a contributor to The Septs journal and specializes in Irish research.  This is from one of his blog posts, “Don’t be so quick to jump over the water in your research. This principle applies to Catholic and Protestant immigrant research.”
      • Irish Family Roots Blog – This is Donna Moughty’s excellent blog.  At the top of the blog page are topics such as:  finding a locality in Ireland and Irish records.  Under the category “More” are articles on civil records, church records and Griffith’s Valuation.
      • Irish Origins – The subtitle to this blog is “Remembering and Honoring Our Past”.  Some of the blog posts include “Irish Genealogy Research Preparation” and “Tracing Ancestors Back to Ireland”.  There are also articles about Irish customs and festivals.
         
    • Blog Posts of Interest
      • Irish Genealogy Toolkit Landed Estate Court Rentals – “The Landed Estates Court was also known as the Encumbered Estates Court and the Land Judges Court.  The Landed Estate Court was set up to deal with land whose owners were either insolvent or otherwise without the resources needed to properly manage their estates. The Court sold off around 8000 estates.  The sales took place 1849-1875. More than half a million tenants are identified, and many maps are included.”
      • Vita Brevis American Ancestors Irish Deeds – This post advises, “more than 2,000 volumes of recorded “memorials” (detailed abstracts) of deeds, conveyances, and wills spanning more than 200 years can be found in the Irish Registry of Deeds.”  They are online at FamilySearch.org (you must sign-in with a free account) and the link to the collection is Transcripts of memorials of deeds, conveyances and wills, 1708-1929
      • Findmypast.com Blog Researching Irish Names – In this post, “Fiona Fitzsimons of the Irish Family History Centre shares her insider tips for uncovering the origin of your Irish family name.”
      • FamilySearch.org Blog Unique Irish Names – The meaning and origin of some Irish girls and boys first names.
      • A Letter from Ireland Irish Surnames and Their Counties – This article has over 3700 different surnames that are listed by county that readers have provided when they sign up for the weekly newsletter.  Each county has a graphic filled with names that you can enlarge and the most common surnames are listed in a larger font.
      • Findmypast.com Blog Free Newspapers – “In partnership with the British Library, we've made over a million newspaper pages completely free to search and view. And there's much more to come.”  This post also includes a short video on how to access the free collection.
      • Family Locket Blog Tracing Your Irish Ancestors – This is a 3 part series and this link is to part 1.  The links to part 2 and 3 are after the post.  Part 1 is Ask the Right Question to begin your research, Part 2 is Irish Research, and Part 3 is Community and DNA.
      • FindMyPast.org Blog Beginner’s Guide – This post is also helpful for a more experienced user since it includes links to the record sets.  The post may also guide you to records collections that you were not aware of.
      • Ireland Reaching Out How to Locate Parish of Origin – “Irish parishes have been around for a long time. The sense of identity associated with them, in rural Ireland especially, remains incredibly strong (even for those who have lived elsewhere for a lifetime). To every family tree that is a puzzle, the parish of origin is a key corner piece from which the rest of the picture can be formed.”
      • Irish Family Roots Irish Links – Donna Moughty has links to Irish resources on this page.  Take a look at the Irish County links for Antrim to Londonderry and Longford to Wicklow.  Once you click on the pertinent link, there are then specific links to resources by county.
      • Irish Ancestors Blog How to Identify Irish Places – John Grenham’s post about, “Identifying an Irish place-name can be maddeningly frustrating. You’ve found that all-important birth record and it supplies a precise address. Now you can unlock all those records of property, tax, inheritance, tenancy … Except that the place-name appears nowhere else.”
    • Podcasts
      • A Letter from Ireland Podcasts – “Welcome to the podcast archive page for The Letter from Ireland Show. Here you'll find a list of all of our podcast episodes covering Irish Genealogy & Family History, Irish Surnames, Irish Culture & Customs, Ireland Travel and much more. Everything published on the site is listed in reverse chronological order.”
      • Irish Family History Centre – While you can subscribe to this website for a fee, there is a free portion which includes:  Podcasts, and the highly recommended free downloads of Irish family Lives Remembered magazine. 
      • The Genealogy Radio Show Podcast – The podcasts are produced and presented by Lorna Moloney.  Some of the topics include “Irish Surnames” and “Genealogy Researching in Ireland”.  Many of the podcasts include a link to a blog post of sources for the podcast. 
      • Irish History Podcasts – “One thousand years of fascinating stories.  From the Great Famine to the War of Independence, the Norman Invasions – the podcasts tell our history like you have never heard it before.”  The home page lists series by topic and indicates how many episodes in the series.
      • Journeys into Genealogy Podcast – Emma Cox hosts, “Conversations with genealogy experts, historians, museum curators and people with interesting stories.”  Topics range from getting started writing your story to what to do with inherited research.  Scroll down and on the right are the links to the podcasts.
         
    • Podcasts of Interest
       
  • Facebook Groups
    • Here are some suggested Facebook groups to consider. We recommend you take a look at the "Genealogy on Facebook List" which in noted below.
    • Genealogy on Facebook List – Katherine Willson created this list of more than 16,700 list of genealogy Facebook groups and you can download the document.  It was updated in January 2021 for genealogy & history Facebook groups/pages (in English).  There are Irish Facebook groups for counties, and topics such as clans and surnames, and archives.  Cyndi Ingle of Cyndi’s List is migrating the list and Cyndi’s List is currently under construction.  Cyndi’s List of Facebook Groups
    • Irish Genealogical Society International Facebook Group – Keep up with the latest news from IGSI.  Make sure you “Like” the page.  Note, we are also on Twitter.
    • Irish Family History Centre Facebook Group – “Genealogy Live at Five(ish) Dublin” time.  Expert Genealogist Fiona Fitzsimons, answers all your questions on Irish Family & Social History.  On Fridays at 12:00 ET, Fiona Fitzsimons has a ninety minute Facebook Live session where she helps people who have previously submitted questions.  She also answers questions that have been posted in the comments during the session.  The Facebook Live sessions are recorded and can be watched later.
    • Ireland:  Genealogy & Heritage Facebook Group – The “Files” section has helpful and interesting documents that have been uploaded such as:  “Class Struggle in Ireland (1760 – 1840), “Irish Family Names – Derivatives and Diminutives and “Census Substitutions”.
    • FindMyPast.com Facebook Group – Even if you do not have a subscription, there are interesting discussions, people answering questions and of course records and collections being added to FindMyPast.  See the Videos in this section for information about their videos.
    • Irish Genealogy Facebook Group – “The aim of this group is to create an archive of family histories for those whose families have lived in Ireland.”  There is a series of posts about ancient clans in Ireland that are very interesting.
    • Irish Genealogical Research Society Facebook Group – Posts range from new publications to notification of new blog posts from John Grenham and Claire Santry.
    • National Library of Ireland Facebook Group – Interesting posts about heritage, culture and history. 
    • Registry of Deeds Index Project Ireland Facebook Group – “The Registry of Deeds Index Project is a volunteer project to provide a full names index to the memorial transcription volumes of the Registry of Deeds Ireland.”  See details about this project under the Websites section.
    • Irish Genealogical Society of Ireland Facebook Group – Posts include historical information.
    • Roots Ireland Facebook Group – By following Roots Ireland’s Facebook group, they post when they have sales, new records, and see the historical pictures they post.
    • Ireland Reaching Out Facebook Group – The benefit of joining this group is that they post about new articles that are on their website.  In addition, there are posts with context and historical information.  Members of the group post interesting information and links as well. 
    • My Heart is in Ireland – Beside a great name for the group, there are over 60,000 members from around the world on this site.  Pinned topics include Ireland, history and folklore.
  • Videos
    • IGSI Past Recorded Webinars – IGSI members have exclusive access to the past recorded webinars and handouts.  Some of the webinars are free, and others are for a fee.
    • FamilySearch.org Learning Center Search Page – You will need to have a free FamilySearch.org account.  There are over 900 videos on the searchable site.
    • FamilySearch Learning Center for Ireland – There are more than 25 videos in the Learning center.  Some of the topics include Civil Registration, Presbyterian Church Records, Emigration and Catholic Church Records.
    • The Family History Guide – This is another amazing learning website from FamilySearch, which includes an introduction to using FamilySearch, Ancestry, MyHeritage and FindMyPast.  The Countries tab has an incredible amount of information for the US, Ireland, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.  The Countries tab also includes helpful videos.
  • YouTube Channels
    • Irish Ancestors YouTube Channel  – Many of the videos on John Grenham’s YouTube channel are about using the free portion of his website Irish Ancestors.  
    • Findmypast.com YouTube Channel – Note that there are Facebook Live presentations on their Findmypast Facebook page and they are simultaneous on YouTube live at 11:00 ET on most Wednesdays and Fridays.  The recording are available on their YouTube channel.
    • National Library of Ireland YouTube Channel – For example, there is a video series around 2 minutes each titled, “Around the Island” which includes counties such as Cork, and Tipperary.  The videos are images from each county that are in their collection.
    • Donna Moughty YouTube Channel – These excellent videos are 10 – 15 minutes and such topics as:  National Library of Ireland, Ask About Ireland, National Archives, Roots Ireland, Irish Genealogy.ie and Irish Ancestors – Surname Distribution.
    • Ireland Reaching Out YouTube Channel – Ireland Reaching Out is also known as IrelandXO.  There are videos about using the free website, Irish Census and Substitutions, Griffith’s Valuation and The Diaspora. 
  • Videos of Interest
    • Irish Ancestors Starting Irish Research – While John Grenham titles this video as “Starting your Family Research”, there is information that is helpful to everyone doing Irish research.
    • Irish Ancestors Understanding Irish Place-names – This is a short 14 minute video.  “Knowing the various parts that make up Irish place-names can help with identifying them. This video goes into some of the details.”
    • Ireland Reaching Out Epic Journeys Through New York Ports – While this looks at the journey to NY ports, there is terrific information about the journey no matter what port your ancestors arrived at.  “We discussed how the Irish emigrated from Ireland to the New York ports in the 1800s and the 1900s. We looked at the various ports the Irish emigrated to during this time and the journeys undertaken by many people from their homes in Ireland to Ellis Island or Castle Garden.”
    • Allen County Library Using WorldCat – WorldCat is a catalog that itemizes the collections of more than 15,000 libraries in over 100 countries.  “Join us to find out how to turn WorldCat, the largest compilation of library resources in the world, into your discovery toolbox!”
    • North Mayo Heritage Centre Tithe Applotment Books – An interesting 3 minute video on the history of the Tithe tax in Ireland.  For example, did you know that land was measured in Irish acres and that 11 Irish acres equaled 14 English acres?
    • North Mayo Heritage Centre Griffith’s Valuation – A quick 2 minute video to introduction to Griffith’s Valuation which was a land taxation survey conducted from 1847 – 1864.
    • Genealogy TV YouTube How to Research Irish Ancestors – Pam Holland is the guest genealogist on this episode.  There is a handout link in the show notes.  “Learn about Irish Genealogy Research.  In this episode we explore the types of Irish records you can find and where to look for them online.”
    • Ancestry.com YouTube Irish Family History – Joe Buggy is Ancestry’s professional genealogist and he discusses Ancestry’s Irish collection that he recommends for research.  He covers 3 major collections including Catholic Parish Registers, Griffith’s Valuation which includes some helpful information, and the Sustainability Land Fund.
    • FindMyPast You Tube Irish Family History is Easy – “Now is the perfect time to add some four leaf clovers to your family tree.”  Brian Donovan’s 40 minute video covers the language differences in Ireland, makes the point that Ireland was England’s oldest colony and how it impacted the country, and major records collections that are available. 
    • FindMyPast Everything You Need to Know About Irish Family History – This is a 54 minute video.  Brian Donovan “takes us through the Findmypast collection of Irish family history records, their importance and how to make the most of them.”
    • National Library of Ireland You Tube Digital Collection – A quick 2 minute video to introduce, “Timpeall na Tíre, our initiative inviting you to delve into the breadth of digital items in our collections relating to cities, towns, villages and townlands across the island of Ireland. Connect and reconnect with the history, heritage and culture of your locality through photographs, pamphlets, maps, music manuscripts and prints and drawings.”
    • Donna Moughty YouTube IrishGenealogy.ie – This 15 minute video is an excellent introduction to the free IrishGenealogy.ie website.  She goes through not only how to use the website but the research method to get further back in your tree.
    • How to Use Griffith’s Valuation – “Here is a simple guide on how to use the Griffith's Valuation. This is a great tool to find out a little bit about the history of the Irish landscape, what it looked like in the 1850's, and who lived in the houses and properties.”  This is a 16 minute video and while the example the presenter uses is in County Donegal, it is applicable to any county.
    • Irish Ancestors Reverse Genealogy 2, Valuation Revision Books – John Grenham advises, “The single most important resource for identifying living relatives is the collection of revisions made to Griffith's Valuation over almost a century and a half. This video shows how to use them.”
    • Irish Ancestors - The Griffith’s Maps – John Grenham’s video on using his Irish Ancestor website to access Griffith’s Valuation from the site.  He also discusses using Griffith’s.  This is a 13 minute video.
  • Bookshelf

    If you live in or are visiting the Twin Cities area of Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota, please visit our IGSI collection housed in the Minnesota Genealogy Center just across the river from the MSP airport. The Hoffman Research Library has a great catalog that will help you find titles for the topic or area you are researching.

    • Connolly, S.J., Editor.  The Oxford Companion to Irish History 2E.  Oxford University Press, New York, 2011.
    • Diner, Hasia R.  Erin’s Daughters in America:  Irish Immigrant Women in the Nineteenth Century.  The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland, 1983.
    • Grenham, John.  Tracing Your Irish Ancestors, 5E.  Gill Books, Dublin, Ireland, 2019. 
    • Haddad, Diane.  Family Tree Factbook: Key Genealogy Tips and Stats for the Busy Researcher.   Family Tree Books, Cincinnati, Ohio, 2018.
    • Helfearty, Seamus and Refausse, Raymond, Editors.  Directory of Irish Archives, 5E.  Four Courts Press, Dublin, Ireland and Chicago, Illinois, 2011.
    • Kinealy, Christine and Moran, Gerard, Editors.  Irish Famines:  Before and After the Great Hunger.  Quinnipiac University Press, Hamden, Connecticut, 2020.
    • MacLysaght, Edward.  The Surnames of Ireland 6E.  Irish Academic Press, Portland, Oregon, 1985.
    • MacLysaght, Edward.  Guide to Irish Surnames.  Helicon, Dublin, Ireland, 1964.
    • Martin, Charles Trice.  The Record Interpreter:  A Collection of Abbreviations, Latin Words and Names Used in English Historical Manuscripts and Records.  Reeves and Turner, London, 1891.  This can be found on Internet Archive.org.
    • Matheson, Robert E.  Varieties and Synonymes of Surnames and Christian Names in Ireland:  For the Guidance of Registration Officers and the Public in Searching the Indexes of Birth, Deaths, and Marriages.  Heritage Books, Berwyn Heights, Maryland 2019, reprint of the 1901 edition.  This can also be found on Internet Archive.org or Google Books.
    • Maxwell, Ian.  Your Irish Ancestors:  A Guide for Family Historians.  Pen & Sword Books, Yorkshire, England, 2019.
    • McGee, Frances.  The Archives of the Valuation of Ireland 1830-1865. Four Courts Press, Dublin, Ireland and Chicago, Illinois, 2018.
    • Miller, Kerby A.  Emigrants and Exiles: Ireland and the Irish Exodus to North America.  Oxford University Press, New York, 1985.
    • Mitchell, Brian.  A New Genealogical Atlas of Ireland, 2E.  Genealogical Publishing, Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 2002.
    • Mitchell, Brian. Finding Your Irish Ancestors: Unique Aspects of Irish Genealogy.  Clearfield Company, Baltimore, Maryland, 2001.
    • Mitchell, Brian.  Irish Passenger Lists 1847-1871: Lists of Passengers Sailing from Londonderry to American on Ships of the J&J Cooke Line and the McCorkell Line.  Genealogical Publishing, Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, 1988.
    • Mitchell, Brian.  New Pocket Guide to Irish Genealogy.  Clearfield Company, Baltimore, Maryland, 2020. 
    • O’Neill, Robert K.  Irish Libraries:  Archives, Museums & Genealogical Centers.  Ulster Historical Foundation, Belfast, Ireland, 2007.
    • Ouimette, David.  Finding Your Irish Ancestors, A Beginner’s Guide.  Ancestry a Division of My Family, Provo, Utah, 2005.
    • Paton, Chris.  Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet: A Guide for Family Historians, 2E.  Pen & Sword Books, Yorkshire, England, 2019.
    • Paton, Chris.  Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records:  A Guide for Family Historians.  Pen & Sword Books, Yorkshire, England, 2021.
    • Roulston, William J.  Farming Ancestors in Ireland.  Ulster Historical Foundation, Belfast, Ireland, 2021.
    • Roulston, William J.  Researching Scots Irish Ancestors:  The Essential Genealogical Guide to Early Modern Ulster 2E.  Ulster Historical Foundation, Belfast, Ireland, 2018.
    • Ryan, James G, Editor.  Irish Church Records, 2E.  Flyleaf Press, Dublin, Ireland, 2001
    • Ryan, James.  Sources for Irish Family History:  A Listing of Books and Articles on the History of Irish Families 2021.  The 2E was published in 1991 and is only available at used book dealers.  The newest 2021 edition is greatly expanded and is only available as an eBook at https://www.ancestornetwork.ie/product/sources-2021/.
    • Santry, Claire.  Irish Genealogy Guide:  How to Trace Your Ancestors in Ireland.  Family Tree Books, Cincinnati, Ohio, 2017.
    • Tracing your (county) Ancestors, various authors.  Flyleaf Press, Dublin, Ireland.  This is a series of county specific research guides.  Currently there are more than 10 county guides with more being written.