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Blog Entries: 1 to 25 of 1788
May 24, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Distribution of 1901/1911 surnames
Barry Griffin posted this today in the Facebook group "Irish Genealogy":
 
I map all the surnames for the 1901 and 1911 Irish census. I have now also added maps for each surname showing the distribution for Catholics, Presbyterians and Anglicans. People of Native-Irish and Norman-Irish extraction tend to be Catholic, Scots-Irish (Ulster-Scots) are typically Presbyterian or Anglican, and Anglo-Irish are usually Anglican.
 
Click here to link to Griffin's website.
May 22, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Irish Census Time Capsule
I've been so focused on the release of the 1950 U.S. Census that I totally missed the stories about Ireland's 2022 census, which was conducted on April 3.
 
Ireland's census is taken every five years, twice as often as in the U.S. Under normal circumstances, the Irish headcount would have occurred in 2021 but had to be delayed a year because of the pandemic.
 
At the end of the 2022 Irish Census household form was a space to leave a handwritten message or drawing for descendants or future generations or historians. It was called a Time Capsule, and making an entry was completely voluntary.
 
The entire census document will be sealed until 2122 so the messages will remain private for 100 years. More intriguing than names and ages on a census, the Time Capsule actively captures one's imagination. What insights will future generations get when they read these comments? What will they learn about life in 2022?
 
What would you write if you had the opportunity?
May 19, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Register now for Celtic Connections 2022
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Registration is open for the Celtic Connections Conference 2022. The focus of the conference is Irish, Scots-Irish, Scottish and Welsh Genealogy and Research Topics.
 
Mark your calendars! CCC 2022 begins July 9, 2022 and ends September 30, 2022.
 
More details:
  • 22 international and national speakers will deliver 49 pre-recorded talks
  • Talks will be available 24/7 for almost three months
  • 21 live chats over the course of the three months
  • At least three other small group meetings
  • $99 for full conference
  • One-year free TIARA membership for new members
Here are the Conference Tracks:
  • Researching the Celtic Diaspora
  • Emigration and Immigration Patterns
  • Unique Research Resources
  • DNA
  • Methodologies
  • Case Studies
VIsit the conference website for more information and to register.
 
May 15, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Gretna Green marriage records
Gretna Green is a parish in southern Scotland, on the Scottish side of the border between England and Scotland. Why, you might be asking, should that matter to me as I search for a marriage record?
 
When the English Clandestine Marriage Act was passed in the 1800s, English couples eloped across the border to Gretna Green to marry. When a couple runs away from where they reside to marry in a place with fewer marriage restrictions, those places have come to be called "Gretna Greens." There could be any number of reasons--maybe the area allows marriage at a younger age, or a shorter waiitng period, or no requirement for blood tests or parental consent, or the couple wants the marriage to be a secret.
 
If you've had trouble finding an official marriage record, look for a local Gretna Green. Here are a few such places:
Las Vegas and Reno, Nevada
For northern Illinois--Dubuque, Iowa
For the state of New Jersey and New York City--Elkton, Maryland
For Mobile, Alabama-- Lucedale, George County, Mississippi
For northern Utah--Evanston, Wyoming or Preston, Idaho
For North/South Carolina--Clayton, Raybun County, Georgia
For northern Washington state--Coeur d'Alene, Idaho
For eastern Oregon--Weiser, Idaho
 
By no means is that an exhaustive list. More valuable information can be found on Family Search about Gretna Greens in the U.S. 
May 11, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
May 14 is Irish Saturday
If you live in or plan travel to the Twin Cities area, you can visit 
the Hoffman Research Library at the Minnesota Genealogy
Center in Mendota Heights during its normal library business
hours for in-person research. It has reopened to researchers
and houses the extensive (3,000+ item) IGSI research collection. 
 
Visit the library on Irish Saturday when IGSI volunteers can help you start your research or talk through that problem ancestor.    The library is usually open 10 AM – 4 PM on Saturdays. 
 
Before you travel, check our website www.irishgenealogical.org  to confirm the library will be open, as it occasionally closes due to poor weather or other issues.
 
Admittance to the MGS library is FREE to IGSI members.  Masks are recommended for everyone but optional for the fully vaccinated (consistent with Dakota County, MN, policy).
May 10, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Millions of genealogy clues at PERSI
If you haven't looked at what's available on the Periodical Source Index (PERSI) lately, you're going to want to fix that situation soon.
 
I was strongly motivated after viewing Amy Johnson Crow's YouTube video entitled "Find Millions of Genealogy Clues with This Free Website."
 
Rather than spend time describing the fascinating articles I found on PERSI, I'll simply point you in the right direction. Click here and listen to Amy tell you about this great resource. Happy researching!
May 8, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Trip to Ireland open to non-IGSI members
The last six spots on the IGSI/Celtic Journeys trip to Ireland are now open to non-members!
 
The September 26-October 8, 2022 itinerary starts and ends in Dublin. Enjoy a counterclockwise tour of 'not so familiar Irish gems' that are off the regular tourist trail, plus opportunities to spend time researching at various libraries and records offices in both Belfast and Dublin.  
 
Included in your trip:
  • Accommodations for 11 nights & full breakfast each morningLogo for Celtic Journeys:  Ireland & Beyond
  • 8 Evening dinners, including Dinner & Entertainment in Dublin on last night
  • Entrance Fees:  Glenveagh National Park ~ Tower Museum ~ Giants Causeway ~ Slieve League ~ Rock of Cashel ~ EPIC ~ Cobh Heritage Centre
  • Cruise on Lough Derg
  • Derry Walking Tour
  • Transportation with a professional driver/guide including fuel and drivers, meals and expenses.
 See the Ireland Trip page at left for more details and registration form.
May 4, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Upcoming Webinars about Irish research
It's not too late to register for this Saturday's webinar:
 
May 7 – Innovation in Ireland: Creative Resources for Your Irish Research with Jen Baldwin of Findmypast
10:30am – Noon CDT (UTC-05:00)
Irish genealogy is notoriously difficult, so researchers must apply creative tools and techniques - as well as use creative records - to obtain positive results. Explore a variety of routes through Irish family history and learn more about the collections available on Findmypast and elsewhere.
 
Start planning ahead for other Irish programs:
 
June 4 – The Power of Names in Irish Family History with David Ouimette of FamilySearch
10:30am – Noon CDT (UTC-05:00)
Names are the most powerful means of identifying ancestors. In this presentation we illustrate three name-based techniques for tracing Irish ancestors: name-variant research, cluster genealogy, and surname heat maps. Name-variant research uncovers the numerous ways your Irish ancestral surnames and given names appear in original documents and indexes, thus helping you discover more family records.
 
Cluster genealogy focuses on researching extended family and Irish neighbors who may have the same origins as your illusive immigrant ancestors. Surname heat maps leverage the idea that your Irish ancestors and their surnames were likely tied to specific parishes over several generations; creating heat maps for multiple surnames reveals where the family names were collocated in Ireland. All three of these techniques capitalize on the power of names in Irish family history.
 
July 16 - An Overview of Irish History with Dr. Paul MacCotter
10:30 AM - Noon  CDT (UTC-5.00)
Historians estimate that Ireland was first settled by humans about 10,000 years ago. To our knowledge no one has traced their ancestors back that far but…wouldn’t you like to know what was happening in Ireland when your ancestors did live there? Join us as Dr. MacCotter takes us on an overview journey through Irish history. He touches briefly on all the key issues, challenging the many myths and legends and replacing them with the true picture of who are the Irish and what is their history.
 
All you need to attend is an internet-connected device with audio capabilities (computer, iPad, smartphone, etc.)
 
For more information and to register, check out the IGSI Activities page HERE
 
Unable to attend the live presentation? If you register in advance we will send you a link to the recording and handout a few days following the program for on-demand viewing at your convenience.
April 28, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
A Tale of Two Shows
Celtic Junction Arts Center is sponsoring a Zoom event to highlight Irish history and culture, Friday, April 29, 7:30-8:30 pm. Michelle Schwantes, director of Out of the Mist Celtic Theatre, and cast members will talk about two upcoming plays, The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde and We Are the Sea by Laura Lundgren Smith. To register, contact outofthemistceltictheatre@gmail.com.
 
The following description comes from the Celtic Junction website:

Take a peek behind the curtain and explore how Irish theatre is defined, and what makes it dynamic and unique. Discover why theatre is so often at the forefront of politics, and why producing theatre is still important. Join us as we reveal what the process of creating a show really looks like.

This lively presentation focuses on two very different shows that Out of the Mist Celtic Theatre is currently producing, The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde and We Are the Sea by Laura Lundgren Smith. How does each of these shows explore the nature of Irish identity and politics? How can two shows, written more than a century apart, both speak to the Irish experience today? How can we use the magic of theatre to bring these stories to vivid and entertaining life?

Join us for an online conversation with the director, Michelle Schwantes, and cast members as we share why we believe these two plays are important in today’s turbulent times.

Out of the Mist Celtic Theatre is devoted to creating engaging and thought-provoking theatre that illuminates the history and diversity of Celtic culture through the lens of the greater human experience. We seek to create community through sharing stories that uplift, inspire, and provide relevant insight on contemporary issues while celebrating our shared humanity.
April 27, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
2022 MGS Writing Contest Opens
The 2022 Minnesota Genealogical Society Writing Competition is now accepting entries! 
 
The competition encourages all genealogists and family historians
to record stories and research findings for posterity. 
 
Entries are due July 1, 2022. 
 
No organization membership is required to enter.
 
View the Competition's one-minute slideshow here.
April 26, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Jumping to conclusions
What family historian hasn't gone down a rabbit hole because our curiosity was piqued, subsequently spending hours researching someone who wasn't an ancestor? It happens to the best of us.
 
Even John Grenham, as it turns out.
 
When John recalled an Irish ditty his father used to sing, he couldn't resist chasing the true-life account of "Bould Thady Quill." I guarantee you'll enjoy reading his April 20th blog posting, and you'll likely identify with the moral of his story.
April 18, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Same name, same place
Have you ever struggled to distinguish between two people with the same name in the same place?
 
If so, you'll appreciate an article about two Richard Condons. Both were Peter Robinson Settlers, an “assisted emigration” scheme which brought 307 Irish to County Peterborough, Ontario, Canada.
 
Which Richard Condon’s biography was published in a church history? Elizabeth Reynolds Moye tackles multiple sources in Ontario and Britain, even British Parliamentary Papers, to find the answer. Join the author on the research trail through Ontario: 
 
Elizabeth Reynolds Moye, “The Identities of Two Richard Condons of Peterborough County, Ontario, Canada,” National Genealogical Society Quarterly 110:1 (March 2022) pp. 39-52.
 
This issue can be found at the Minnesota Genealogy Center Hoffman Research Library in Mendota Heights, Minnesota. Check the MGS website for hours.
 
Many thanks to Sue Kratsch for writing and sharing this helpful recommendation!
April 18, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
James Shields--County Tyrone to America
Jane Kennedy, historian and IGSI member, wrote a fascinating article titled "James Shields: County Tyrone's Gift to America," which was published online in the Celtic Junction Arts Review.
 
Read here about Shields' adventures and accomplishments "from politics to the battlefield."
April 13, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
LandedEstates website is back up
LandedEstates is a free Irish database of landed estates and historic houses in Connacht and Munster, circa 1700-1914. 
 
The site went offline last fall after a cyber attack on its host, the University of Galway, but it's now back in operation. We've blogged about this great resource before, and now it's looking better than ever. Check it out here.
 
By the way, did you know you could quickly search all (1775, as of today) IGSI blog entries? In the block at the top left of this page, choose 'Blog Title' or 'Title & Text' in the Search drop-down menu and enter whatever subject you seek. Voila! All the postings about that topic going back to July 2011! One can also sort by Category or Timeframe.
 
Here are two tidbits about landed estates:
 
My husband's Hickey ancestors came from Cahernahallia, in county Tipperary. Although the Hickeys had left Ireland before Griffiths' Valuation, the owner of Cahernahallia at the time of the valuation was Viscount Lismore. (His original family name was O'Callaghan.) In the 1870s Viscount Lismore owned 34,945 acres in county Tipperary, 6,067 acres in county Cork and 1,194 acres in county Limerick. The NUI landed estates website provides summary information about the estate and directs researchers to archival sources. A fascinating site!
 
"Repositories"  was the theme of the October 2013 issue of The Septs. As always, the journal included several interesting articles, e.g., Fiona Fitzsimons' report on "Irish Family History - Research Online." She gave tips about "Landed Estate Court Rentals," which some professional genealogists call " the 'secret-hero' of Irish genealogy." ...The key to finding President Obama's Irish ancestors was found in the Landed Estate Court Rentals! The "Rentals" are actually sales brochures for properties owned by bankrupt estates which were being sold by the government after the Famine.  Again, sometimes these estate records list tenants and the terms of their leases, which is what identified critical relationships in the Obama ancestral family.
April 5, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
IGSI webinars for an Irish Spring
Will it be an "Irish Spring" for you?   

The IGSI Education Committee reminds you it's not too late to register for this Saturday's webinar... 

April 9 - Emigration from the north of Ireland to North America - sources for researching emigrant ancestors, a special bonus program with Fintan Mullan of the Ulster Historical Foundation
10:30am - Noon CDT (UTC-05:00)
Passenger lists for those leaving Great Britain and Ireland did not start until 1890. Passenger lists were required by the USA to include each passenger's name, birthdate/age, port of departure, name of ship, arrival date, and port of arrival. However, before this period they were not compulsory. Availability of passenger lists for eighteenth and early nineteenth century are quite rare, and in many cases non-existent.

May 7 - Innovation in Ireland: Creative Resources for Your Irish Research with Jen Baldwin of Findmypast
10:30am - Noon CDT (UTC-05:00)
Irish genealogy is notoriously difficult, so researchers must apply creative tools and techniques - as well as use creative records - to obtain positive results. Explore a variety of routes through Irish family history and learn more about the collections available on Findmypast and elsewhere.

June 4 - The Power of Names in Irish Family History with David Ouimette of FamilySearch
10:30am - Noon CDT (UTC-05:00)
Names are the most powerful means of identifying ancestors. In this presentation we illustrate three name-based techniques for tracing Irish ancestors: name-variant research, cluster genealogy, and surname heat maps. Name-variant research uncovers the numerous ways your Irish ancestral surnames and given names appear in original documents and indexes, thus helping you discover more family records.

Cluster genealogy focuses on researching extended family and Irish neighbors who may have the same origins as your illusive immigrant ancestors. Surname heat maps leverage the idea that your Irish ancestors and their surnames were likely tied to specific parishes over several generations; creating heat maps for multiple surnames reveals where the family names were collocated in Ireland. All three of these techniques capitalize on the power of names in Irish family history.

For more information and to register, check out ACTIVITIES at left.

Unable to attend the live presentation? If you register in advance we will send you a link to the recording and handout a few days following the program for on-demand viewing at your convenience.
April 3, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Top FREE Irish genealogy resources
Ireland Reaching Out recently announced its recommendations about the "best FREE Irish ancestry websites for the most relevant archives along with the latest free tools and indexes to help you navigate them." Here they are:
  1. Irish Civil Records Free General Register: Civil Births, Marriages and Deaths

  2. Irish Church Records Free Church Registers: Baptism, Marriage and Burials

  3. Irish Headstones & Obituaries

  4. Irish Census Records

  5. Irish Census Substitutes

Read the full story and get all the details here.
April 1, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Genealogy Heaven -- 1950 U.S. Census
"This is genealogy heaven when a census is rolled out," said Matt Menashes, executive director of the National Genealogical Society. "People are waiting anxiously. It's hard to overstate."
 
You may be one of the people who were waiting anxiously? Perhaps you've already started searching the 1950 U.S. Federal Census? Maybe you've found yourself listed in a census for the first time? The release of U.S. census data occurs only once a decade so this is a significant event.
 
If the April 1 date only made you think of April Fool's Day, you may be interested to read the following, from a CBS news article:

"The records released by the National Archives and Records Administration will be indexed into a searchable website. The digitized, handwritten forms have information about household members' names, race, sex, age, address, occupations, hours worked in the previous week, salaries, education levels, marital status and the country in which their parents were born. The website will include a tool allowing users to fix any incorrect names or add missing names.

Claire Kluskens, a digital projects archivist at the National Archives, acknowledged that what will be on the website starting Friday is "a first draft," in which specific people are most likely to be found initially only by searching for whoever was listed as the head of their household.

Two outside genealogical groups, Ancestry and FamilySearch, a division of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, have teamed up to serve as a quality check on the records by creating their own index separate from the National Archives..."

The effort to create an accurate index could take six to nine months. Or less.

March 30, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Irish-born prisoners in Scottish prison
You never know where you might find a valuable clue!
 
Last month ScotlandsPeople released a new set of records, namely Scottish prison registers held by National Records of Scotland (NRS). This first set of records made available includes admissions to Perth (Scotland) Prison between 1867-1879 and 1888-1921 and can be searched for free here. The images can be viewed and downloaded for a small fee.
 
In her March 24th blog posting, Claire Santry reported that over 10% of the indexed 50,000 prison admissions had been born in Ireland. She provides examples and helpful insights (on multiple topics) at irishgenealogynews.com.
March 23, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Free online New York City vital records
If your ancestors lived in any of the five boroughs of New York, you are going to want to get acquainted with DORIS!
 
DORIS is the acronym for the Department of Records and Information Services in the New York City Municipal Archives. Last week they announced free access to more than 9.3 million vital records on their website. The new online vital records platform lets you search and view historical New York City records of birth (1866-1909), death (1862-1948), and marriage (1866-1949). High-quality copies can be downloaded and printed from the site at no charge.
 
Records will continue to be digitized. You can see more details about what's currently available at Digital Vital Records.
 
Start searching here, by either Certificate Number or Name. Be aware you may need to enter variations of the name to get complete results.
 
D. Joshua Taylor, President of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, was quoted as saying, "The Historical Vital Records project is an absolute game-changer for those tracing New Yorkers. This unprecedented free access to birth, marriage, and death records will help millions discover their New York heritage."
March 17, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
IGSI offerings March-May, 2022
Lá fhéile Pádraig sona 
 
The 'luck of the Irish' looks very promising in the months ahead! Consider these excellent upcoming webinars, brought to you by the IGSI Education Committee:
 
March 19 - Combining DNA & traditional genealogy techniques for Irish family tree research 
                                   Dr. Maurice Gleeson,  10:30am - Noon CDT (UTC-05:00)
$20 to register, or $15 for IGSI members
DNA is a great additional tool for researching your Irish ancestral lines. Join internationally-known expert Maurice Gleeson as he explores various ways in which DNA and documentary evidence can work hand in hand to break through your Irish Brick Walls.
Topics to be explored include:
characterizing each Irish Brick Wall; Irish Naming Convention; ways to grab the low hanging fruit; working with Clusters; Triangulated Segments; triangulating with Y-DNA and mtDNA; and Ancestor Reconstruction. 
Various tools will be mentioned along the way including: Shared cM Tool, WATO, autoclusters, etc. And, in addition, we will discuss how to build a simple but effective Descendancy Chart and Shared DNA Matrix that allows you to see all key matches for a given cluster, from all companies, on a single page. 
 
...and just announced! 

April 9 - Emigration from the north of Ireland to North America - sources for researching emigrant ancestors
      Fintan Mullan of the Ulster Historical Foundation, 10:30am - Noon CDT (UTC-05:00)
$20 to register, or $15 for IGSI members
Passenger lists for those leaving Great Britain and Ireland did not start until 1890. Passenger lists were required by the USA to include each passenger's name, birthdate/age, port of departure, name of ship, arrival date, and port of arrival. However before this period they were not
compulsory. Passenger lists for eighteenth and early nineteenth century are quite rare and in many cases non-existent.
 
May 7 - Innovation in Ireland: Creative Resources for Your Irish Research 
                      Jen Baldwin, 10:30am - Noon CDT (UTC-05:00)
$20 to register, or $15 for IGSI members 
Irish genealogy is notoriously difficult so researchers must apply creative tools and techniques - as well as use creative records - to obtain positive results. Explore a variety of routes through Irish family history and learn more about the collections available on Findmypast and elsewhere. 
 
For more information and to register, click on Activities at left.
 
Unable to attend the live presentation? If you register in advance we will send you a link to the recording and handout a few days following the program for on-demand viewing at your convenience.
March 17, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Happy St. Patrick's Day
The Irish Genealogical Society International extends warm greetings to all our readers on this special day!
 
One of the many benefits of IGSI membership is being able to see digital copies of newsletters and journals on our website, all the way back to June 1980, when our organization was called the 'Irish Interest Group'. 
 
We tip our hats to the early volunteers, two of whom shared a recipe for Irish soda bread in an early 1990 issue. There's still time to bake some for your St Patrick's Day meal tonight:
 
 
 
March 15, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Ancestry specials
The clock is ticking on St Patrick's Day specials!
 
As usual, Ancestry.com is offering some good deals if you're in the market for a DNA kit, but their offers expire on March 17, 2022.
 
An Ancestry DNA kit can be purchased for $59 (regularly $99).  For $1 more, you can add a three-month World Explorer membership. 
 
Do read the fine print: *Offers end 17 Mar 2022 at 11:59 p.m. ET. Excludes shipping. Package offers are for new and returning subscribers only and not for renewal of current subscriptions.
Your WORLD EXPLORER subscription will automatically renew at $79.95 EVERY 3 MONTHS or your ALL ACCESS subscription will automatically renew at $239 EVERY 6 MONTHS until you cancel by visiting your Account Settings or by contacting us. See our Renewal and Cancellation Terms for further details.
 
Read about all the Ancestry specials here.
March 10, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
SCGS Genealogy Jamboree
The Southern California Genealogical Society has held Genealogy Jamboree for 51 years and a Genetic Genealogy Conference for nine. Nationally-known speakers covered the latest developments in genealogy from across the US, Canada, Mexico and the world.
 
This year the Genealogy Jamboree  and Genetic Genealogy Conference will be 100% virtual and streamed on-line again from August 19–27, 2022. All programs and presentations will be available to Jamboree and Genealogy Conference registrants through the end of October. Registration began on March 7, 2022. 
 
Speakers include Michael Brophy, Nicka Sewell Smith, Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, Michael Strauss, Bill Cole, Diahan Southard, David Dowell, Judy Russell, Richard Hill and Kitty Munson Cooper. 
 
David Ryan will present Hidden Treasures: Discovering Local Sources in Your Irish Research, and James G. Ryan will speak on Understanding Irish PlacenamesDuring JamboFree experts will preside at an Irish Roundtable, providing free assistance to attendees. 
 
Read more here.
March 8, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
March 12 is an Irish Saturday
Re-starting your family history research?
 
If you live in or plan travel to the Twin Cities area, you can visit the Hoffman Research Library at the Minnesota Genealogy Center in Mendota Heights during its normal library business hours for in-person research. It has reopened to researchers and houses the extensive (3,000+ item) IGSI research collection. 
 
Visit the library on Irish Saturday when some IGSI volunteers can help you start your research or talk through that problem ancestor.  The library is usually open 10 AM – 4 PM on Saturdays.  Before you travel, check our website www.irishgenealogical.org  to confirm the library will be open, as it occasionally closes due to poor weather or other issues.
 
Admittance to the MGS library is FREE to IGSI members.  Masks are recommended for everyone, but optional for the fully vaccinated (consistent with Dakota County, MN, policy).
 
March 7, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
2022 Family History Writing Competition
      Do you have
  • a good family story to tell?
  • a solution to a family mystery?
  • a need to jump-start your writing?
 
Enter the MGS Family History Writing Competition!
 
Entries are due on July 1, 2022
 
Winners are invited to submit their entries to the Minnesota Genealogist quarterly journal
 
All entries receive helpful comments
 
More Information and FAQ here
 
Sponsored by the Minnesota Genealogical Society