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August 18, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
September Podcast
The latest "This month at the IGSI" podcast is up for your viewing
enjoyment!
 
Dave Miller has again created an entertaining mix of newsy tidbits. 
In this podcast, he conducts interviews at Irish Fair in St Paul and
highlights upcoming IGSI activities scheduled for September.
 
To view, click here.
 
You can also subscribe so you never miss Dave's monthly reports.
August 16, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Free Legacy webinars in September
Legacy Family Tree has announced "Webtember," a series of free live and recorded webinars on Fridays in September.
 
Join live for all five Fridays or just one. If you aren't able to attend, the recordings can be viewed for free until the end of the month.
 
See the remarkable schedule of topics & presenters and register here.
August 11, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Registry of Deeds Update

The Registry of Deeds Project was established to provide finding aids for the records held by the office in Dublin. According to its website, there are three sets of indexes being produced:

  • The main index is building a name index for the memorial transcription books held at the Registry of Deeds
  • The grantors index consists of transcriptions of the Registry of Deeds' grantors indexes
  • The townland index consists of transcriptions of the Registry of Deeds' townland indexes

Index entries are contributed by project volunteers. Each of the index databases can be searched on a number of fields. Read more here.

Periodically the project manager provides updates. Thanks to a helpful blog reader for sharing this Facebook posting with us:
 
Update of 08 August 2022 - 497,717 index records from 51,905 memorials of deeds
 
Yesterday I completed an update that has 497,717 index records from 51,905 memorials of deeds. I thank all our wonderful volunteers for their excellent work. We are getting ever closer to the magic half million entries in our main index.
 
I had to change the scripts behind the 'browse by names' and 'browse by number' pages. They look a little different but produce the same output.
 
In addition, one of our volunteers has completed transcribing the townland index for county Kildare 1708-39. This index also continues to grow. You can see the coverage of the townland indexes here.
 
All the indexes are fully searchable here
August 6, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Connemara Patch dedication on Aug 20
The Parks and Recreation Department of the City of Saint Paul, Minnesota, recently installed an interpretive sign which commemorates the community of Irish immigrants who inhabited an area of Saint Paul known as the Connemara Patch. The community existed from 1881 to the early 20th Century. It occupied an area roughly between East 7th Street and East 3rd Street which today forms parts of both Swede Hollow Park and Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary. It also occupied an area south of the Mississippi River known as the West Side Flats. The interpretive sign is located in Swede Hollow Park alongside the bike trail just south of the 7th Street tunnel.
 
In honor of the past inhabitants of Connemara Patch, their descendants will hold a dedication ceremony near the newly installed sign( at 588 E. 7th Street, St Paul) on August 20, 2022 at 1:00 pm. A social gathering begins at 12:15 pm.
 
The Irish inhabitants of the Connemara Patch community came from the western coastal areas of Counties Galway and Mayo, Ireland. They were small tenant farmers, fisherman, and kelp gatherers who had suffered mightily from the famine that gripped the western counties of Ireland from 1879 to 1881. Most of the early inhabitants traveled to Minnesota under the sponsorship of two emigration plans. The first one was coordinated by Father James Nugent, an English Catholic social reformer, and Bishop John Ireland of the Diocese of Saint Paul, Minnesota. The Catholic Church sponsored the passage of over thirty destitute families and set aside hundreds of acres of farmland near the community of Graceville in Big Stone County, Minnesota. Unfortunately, their lack of large-scale farming experience combined with record-breaking cold and snow during the winter of 1880/1881 caused the experiment to fail. In the spring of 1881, Bishop Ireland released most of the settlers from their obligations and helped them resettle in Saint Paul in the area that became known as the Connemara Patch.
 
The second emigration initiative was sponsored by the Quaker philanthropist James Hack Tuke who brought many more indigent Irish families from Connemara to Minnesota from 1882 to 1884. Largely focused on family units, he established a program that assisted financially poor Irish who wished to emigrate to the United States and Canada. Since many of their family and friends lived in the Connemara Patch and West Side Flats neighborhoods of Saint Paul, the community became a popular destination for the immigrants.
 
The Connemara Patch was a quaint and lively community where the Irish language was widely spoken. Many inhabitants worked for the railroad, served as domestics in local hotels, and made lace. By the late 1880s as their circumstances improved, the Irish in the Connemara Patch began to leave the area for other parts of the city, state, and regions of the United States. By the early 1900s, the Irish were mostly replaced by other ethnic groups. The area was abandoned and structures demolished to make way for freeway construction in the 1950s. Many descendants remained in the West Side Flats until that neighborhood was razed for an industrial park in the early 1960s.
 
Questions about the event can be referred to Colleen Curran at irishcurran6@gmail.com.
August 5, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Ancestor Source Finder Tool
LDSGenealogy.com--an independently owned and operated website not affiliated with the LDS/Mormon Church--was created to help people find information about their ancestors. 
 
Have you run out of hints in your online tree and are stumped about where to look next?
 
The folks at LDSGenealogy.com have created a new tool focusing on U.S. ancestor research. You enter a few details about your ancestor and receive suggestions about other sources to research. Read more in the article on the right.
 
IGSI Co-President Donna Jones reports receiving an interesting document summarizing what she'd entered with research suggestions.
 
A beta version of the Ancestor Source Finder Tool can be found here. Give it a try and share your feedback.
July 25, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Intriguing webinars August-October
Irish culture and property are the focus of upcoming IGSI webinars: 

August 6 - An Irish Farm History with Chris Paton
10:30 AM - Noon CDT (UTC-5)
$20 for non-members


Genealogist Chris Paton will draw together many archival resources to tell the story of an Irish family and their farm in County Kilkenny across the 19th and 20th centuries. Using an array of resources (vital records,newspapers, land records, census and military records) he tells the
genealogical narrative of a family from the 1820s to the mid-20th century. Along the way he will take the story of the family and property from its humblest agricultural beginnings to a dramatic episode of the Irish Civil War, and beyond.

Originally from Northern Ireland, Chris is now based in Scotland. He holds a Postgraduate Diploma in Genealogical Studies from the University of Strathclyde and is an author of many family history books, including Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), Sharing Your Family History Online, and his latest, Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records.
Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6409886031946142990

     --------------------------------------------------------------

Wednesday evening, September 14 - Turning Dry Facts into Exciting Details
with Carol Baxter
7:00 - 8:30 PM CDT (UTC-5)
$20 for non-members


The ancestral facts we labor to find, seem to us as precious as gold. Yet  these nuggets can seem dry to a reader when recited as a family history. How can we make our ancestral histories engaging to our broader family? Some genealogists choose to fictionalize their histories. However, the broader audience can dismiss "recreated" scenes or "reimagined" dialogue. They want to know what really happened. At the opposite extreme is the "encyclopedic" approach.

As an author of your family's history, we do not want your efforts to have an audience of only one! The "dry" facts should be used merely as stepping stones to a broader n rrative. They should never be a destination in themselves. This webinar provides strategies to reach that goal for the benefit of your descendants.

Carol Baxter has a long career as a professional genealogist and writer in Australia. For her services to Australian genealogy and history she became a Fellow of the Society of Australian Genealogists and an adjunct lecturer at the University of New England (NSW).
Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7668027501545909262

     --------------------------------------------------------------

October 15 - Irish Property Records: An Overview with John Grenham
10:30 AM - Noon  CDT (UTC-5)
$20 for non-members


Property leaves traces long after people vanish. This talk looks at historic Irish institutions that recorded property transactions (The Registry of
Deeds) and that created property tax records (The Valuation Office).They are two of the oldest intact record-holding institutions in Ireland and both provide (relatively) unbroken chains of evidence reaching back into the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The talk outlines their history, the key records they hold and how to interpret them and, most importantly, how to get at them, especially online. Forthcoming developments in both will also be described.

John Grenham was Project Manager with the Irish Genealogical Project from 1991 to 1995 and later went on to develop and market his own genealogical software, Grenham's Irish Recordfinder. In 2005, he was the first Genealogist-in-Residence at Dublin City Library. He was awarded a fellowship of The Irish Genealogical Research Society in 2007 and of the Genealogical Society of Ireland in 2010. He
is the author of Tracing your Irish Ancestors (5th ed. Dublin, Baltimore MD, 2019), the standard reference guide for Irish genealogy, The Atlantic Coast of Ireland (2014), Clans and Families of Ireland (1995), and An Illustrated History of Ireland (1997), among other works. He wrote the "Irish Roots" column in The Irish Times from 2009 to 2016, developed heritage databases, and ran the Irish Ancestors website in conjunction with The Irish Times until 2016. He now runs the successor website at www.johngrenham.com.
Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2430822721345751052

For more information about any of the webinars or to register, click on the Activities page at left.

Unable to attend the live presentation? If you register in advance we will send you a link to the recording and handout a few days following the program for on-demand viewing at your convenience.

Education Team: Trish Little-Taylor & Walt Rothwell
Irish Genealogical Society International
1385 Mendota Heights Road Suite 100
Mendota Heights, Minnesota 55120 * USA

Image by Dee-Burke
Sheep grazing in County Donegal, Ireland
July 23, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
IGSI Trip to Ireland
Are you a last-minute decision-maker? This information is for you! 
 
Almost two dozen members and friends are making the IGSI trip to Ireland--leaving Monday, September 26, and returning Saturday, October 8.  With the trip starting in just two months, there is still time and space to join us. 
 
Our travel company, Celtic Journeys, has arranged a full agenda offering a taste of the counties: 11 days of travel through a large portion of the island (east-north-west-south).  We’ll visit Belfast in Northern Ireland, explore the Giant’s Causeway, and walk the walls of the city of Derry. We’ll see the high sea cliffs of western Ireland, walk the cobblestone streets of Galway, and enjoy a cruise on Lough Derg. County names like Donegal, Tipperary, Cork will have greater meaning after being there. Visits to Cobh’s Queenstown Heritage Centre and the Irish Emigration Museum (EPIC) in Dublin reveal the world of your ancestors.
 
Some of our travelers have added a few days before or after the tour to explore further or do some family history research. Late September and early October are great times to travel in Ireland.
 
Click on Ireland Trip at left to see the brochure and registration form, or email your questions to trip@irishgenealogical.org.
July 18, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Ireland Online Genealogy Records
FamilySearch is a magnificent resource but sometimes overlooked when we're doing Irish genealogy research.
 
The FamilySearch staff has created a summary--by date and category--of all online Ireland records avalable from a wide range of sources including FamilySearch, Ancestry, Findmypast, MyHeritage, RootsIreland, etc.
 
These are genealogy links to Ireland online databases and indexes that may include birth records, marriage records, death records, biographies, cemeteries, censuses, histories, immigration records, land records, military records, newspapers, obituaries, or probate records.
 
Take a look and consider bookmarking this excellent wiki: Ireland Online Genealogy Records.
July 13, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Overview of Irish History (webinar)
Is the weather too hot for you? Are you nervous about the BA.5 variant? Here's a great weekend alternative!
 
Saturday, July 16
An Overview of Irish History  (Webinars)
GoToWebinar - from the comfort and safety           of your own home
10:30 AM - Noon  CDT (UTC-5)
Instructor: Paul MacCotter
A free event for IGSI members (with Discount Code sent in member email); $20 for non-members
 
Historians estimate that Ireland was first settled by humans about 10,000 years ago. To our knowledge no one has traced their ancestors back that far but…wouldn’t you like to know what was happening in Ireland when your ancestors did live there? Join us as Dr. MacCotter takes us on an overview journey through Irish history. He touches briefly on all the key issues, challenging the many myths and legends and replacing them with the true picture of who are the Irish and what is their history.
 
All you need to attend is an internet-connected device with audio capabilities (computer, iPad, smartphone, etc.)
 
Register here.
 
Image by Hari Mohan from Pixabay:
Old Church in Dún Lúiche (Dunlewey or Dunlewy), a small Gaeltacht village in the Gweedore area of County Donegal, Ireland
July 8, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Not too late for Celtic Connections 2022
It's not too late to register for the Virtual Celtic Connections Conference 2022, which occurs July 9-September 30, 2022. The following information comes from our friends at TIARA (The Irish Ancestral Research Association):
 
Over 300 of your friends and colleagues have already registered for this conference. Registering today makes it possible for you to connect with them during the interactive live events that are scheduled throughout the conference.
 
The focus of the conference is Irish, Scots-Irish, Scottish and Welsh Genealogy and Research Topics.
 
 The details for the CCC 2022 Conference are:
  • 21 international and national speakers will deliver 50 pre-recorded presentations
  • Presentations will be available 24/7 from July 9 to Sept. 30--almost 3 months
  • Twenty-one live chats over the course of the three months
  • At least 5 other small group meetings
  • $99 for full conference
  • Five Conference Tracks
  • One-year free TIARA membership for new members.
Conference Tracks:
  • Researching the Celtic Diaspora
  • Emigration and Immigration Patterns
  • Unique Research Resources
  • DNA
  • Methodologies
  • Case Studies
 
Visit the conference website www.celtic-connections.org for more detailed information and updates.
 
Questions? Contact: registration@celtic-connections.org
 
July 7, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
July 9 is Irish Saturday at MGC
The second Saturday of each month is generally Irish Saturday at the Hoffman Research Library, located at the Minnesota Genealogy Center (MGC) in Mendota Heights. 
 
The library will be open this Saturday, July 9 (10 AM – 4 PM), with some IGSI volunteers available to help you start your research or talk through that problem ancestor. 
 
Admittance to the Hoffman Research Library is FREE to IGSI members.  Masks are recommended for everyone but optional for the fully vaccinated.
 
To plan your library visit, read more here.
July 5, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
IGSI launches monthly YouTube podcasts

Check out a monthly podcast on the IGSI YouTube Channel. The program called “This Month at the IGSI” and hosted by genealogist Dave Miller will provide the latest information regarding Irish Genealogical Society International and what activities are planned for the upcoming month. 

Miller says the first couple of podcasts will start out briefly talking about events planned for the coming month. Eventually we plan to interview some of the speakers for the upcoming webinars and talk to those who will be involved in events for that month. This is another social media source that people can access to receive the latest news and information within the IGSI! You have always been able to obtain the latest IGSI news on the website. (Click on topics shown at left.) Plus you can locate us on other social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter.

 
You can find the first (July 2022) podcast on the IGSI’s YouTube channel here.
July 1, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
IGSI summer webinars -- plan now!
The next series of webinars are for veteran and novice researchers alike, AND include free offerings for our IGSI members.
 
July 16 - An Overview of Irish History with Dr. Paul MacCotter
10:30 AM - Noon  CDT (UTC-5)
Free for IGSI members with Discount Code; $20 for non-members
Historians estimate that Ireland was first settled about 10,000 years ago. Few have traced their ancestors back that far, but wouldn’t you like to know what was happening in Ireland when your ancestors did live there? Join us as Dr. MacCotter takes us on a journey through Irish history. He touches briefly on key moments and issues, challenging many myths and legends and replacing them with a true picture of who are the Irish and what is their history.
 
Dr. MacCotter (MA, PhD, MAGI) teaches genealogy, family history and medieval history at University College Cork. Since 1993 he has published widely in the fields of genealogy, family history and several branches of Irish medieval history.
 
 
     --------------------------------------------------------------
 
August 6 - An Irish Farm History with Chris Paton
10:30 AM - Noon CDT (UTC-5)
Free! for IGSI members with Discount Code; $20 for non-members
Genealogist Chris Paton will draw together many archival resources to tell the story of an Irish family and their farm in County Kilkenny across the 19th and 20th centuries. Using an array of resources (vital records, newspapers, land records, census and military records) he tells the genealogical narrative of a family from the 1820s to the mid-20th century. Along the way he will take the story of the family and property from its humblest agricultural beginnings to a dramatic episode of the Irish Civil War, and beyond.
 
Originally from Northern Ireland, Chris is now based in Scotland. He holds a Postgraduate Diploma in Genealogical Studies from the University of Strathclyde and is an author of many family history books, including Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), Sharing Your Family History Online, and his latest, Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records.
 
 
     --------------------------------------------------------------
 
Wednesday evening, September 14 - Turning Dry Facts into Exciting Details with Carol Baxter
7:00 - 8:30 PM CDT (UTC-5)
$15 for IGSI members with Discount Code; $20 for non-members
The ancestral facts we labor to find, seem to us as precious as gold. Yet these nuggets can seem dry to a reader when recited as a family history. How can we make our ancestral histories engaging to our broader family? Some genealogists choose to fictionalize their histories. However, the broader audience can dismiss “recreated” scenes or “reimagined” dialogue. They want to know what really happened. At the opposite extreme if the "encyclopedic" approach
 
As an author of your family's history, we do not want your efforts to have an audience of only one! The "dry" facts should be used merely as stepping stones to a broader narrative. They should never be a destination in themselves. This webinar provides strategies to reach that goal for the benefit of your descendants.
 
Carol Baxter has a long career as a professional genealogist and writer in Australia. For her services to Australian genealogy and history she became a Fellow of the Society of Australian Genealogists and an adjunct lecturer at the University of New England (NSW).
 
 
For more information and to register, check out the IGSI Activities page
https://irishgenealogical.org/eventListings.php?nm=34.
 
Unable to attend the live presentation? If you register in advance we will send you a link to the recording and handout a few days following the program for on-demand viewing at your convenience.
 
     --------------------------------------------------------------
 
ALSO, if you were not able to attend the outstanding June program you can still do so! If you registered for the webinar in advance, you received an email on June 4 with a link to the recording and handout. If yoou were not registered, members can still purchase access to the recorded session + handout for $15 at this link:
https://irishgenealogical.org/cpage.php?pt=125
 
The Power of Names in Irish Family History with David Ouimette of FamilySearch
Names are the most powerful means of identifying ancestors. This presentation illustrates three name-based techniques for tracing your ancestors: name-variant research, cluster genealogy, and surname heat maps. While the presenter focuses on Irish ancestors, these techniques are of great value to all researchers.
 
David Ouimette, CG, manages Content Strategy at FamilySearch, prioritizing records of genealogical value for digital preservation and online publication... on a worldwide scope. David authored Finding Your Irish Ancestors: A Beginner’s Guide and is an outstanding presenter. Please don't miss this wonderful presentation.
 
June 20, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
10 facts about land ownership in Ireland
"Ireland Reaching Out (Ireland XO) is a volunteer-based, non-profit initiative which builds vibrant, lasting links between the global Irish Diaspora and parishes of origin in Ireland," its website states.
 
You can send queries to Ireland XO which will be answered by Irish people still living in the locale where your ancestors resided. Membership is free, and once you sign up, you'll also receive periodic emails with information to help you research.
 
The most recent article, "10 Facts About Land Ownership in Ireland," is fantastic! Jane Halloran Ryan--County Clare Genealogist, owner of Dalcassian Origins and an IGSI member--writes about land ownership traditions in Ireland and lists some of the most useful land records available to researchers.  Read her article here.
June 14, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Virtual CCC 2022 coming soon!
 
Join TIARA for the Virtual Celtic Connections Conference (CCC) 2022. Registration began on April 9, 2022 and is on-going. The conference begins on July 9, 2022 at 10:00 AM and continues until midnight September 30, 2022. Participants will have access to fifty-two pre-recorded lectures, fifteen chat sessions, five roundtables and an Ancestors Roadshow. All for just $99!
 
TIARA’s 2022 CCCC will focus on Irish, Scots-Irish, Scottish and Welsh Genealogy and Research Topics. There will be six conference tracks: Researching the Celtic Diaspora, Emigration and Immigration Patterns, Unique Research Resources, DNA, Methodologies, and Case Studies.
 
Twenty-two national international speakers, including John Grenham, Fiona Fitzsimons. Maurice Gleeson, Chris Paton, Paul Milner, Donna Moughty and our own TIARA members Pamela Guye-Holland, Sheila Benedict and Susan O’Connor will present fifty-two pre-recorded lectures. The pre-recorded lectures are available for almost three months twenty-four hours a day. Chat sessions will be held on Thursday evenings and Saturday afternoons throughout the conference. Roundtables are scheduled for Sunday afternoons. A complete list and calendar of event is on the CCC website.
 
A planning committee chaired by Janis Duffy and Greg Atkinson has been meeting since 2020 and they are excited to present CCC 2022. The first Celtic Connections Conference was conceived and prodded into action by the late Mary Choppa, a former President of TIARA in 2014. Mary sadly passed away in 2021.  TIARA is dedicating CCC 2022 in Mary’s memory.
 
Updated information about the Conference can be found on the CCC website at celtic-connections.org. Any questions? Contact info@celtic-connections.org.
 
June 12, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Irish given names
Mike Collin's latest Letter from Ireland is fascinating!
 
(If you'd like to find a letter from Ireland in your email box every Sunday morning, read more here. It's free and always entertaining.)
 
Today's topic was "Do you know your name in Irish?" Mike provided Irish equivalents--and pronunciations--of "English" given names for both girls and boys. He suggests you could "have some fun" by occasionally calling friends and family by the Irish version of their name.
 
English Names and Irish Equivalents
Let’s start with some girls' names:
  • English: Jane/Janet – Equivalent Irish: Sinéad (pronounced "Shin-ade").
  • English: Barbara – Equivalent Irish: Gormladh (pronounced "Gurm-la").
  • English: Joan/Joanna/Hannah – Equivalent Irish: Siobhán (pronounced "Shiv-awn").
  • English: Margaret – Equivalent Irish: Mairéad (pronounced "Mor-ade").
  • English: Elizabeth – Equivalent Irish: Sibeal (pronounced "Sybil").
  • English: Abigail/Deborah – Equivalent Irish: Gobnait (pronounced "Gub-nit").
  • English: Grace – Equivalent Irish: Gráinne (pronounced "Grawn-ya").
  • English: Marion– Equivalent Irish: Muireann (pronounced "Mwir-in").
And on to the boys:
  • English: Charles – Equivalent Irish: Cathal (pronounced "Cah-hal"). This also gives us the surname Cahill. As you may be aware, most Irish surnames are derived from first names.
  • English: Terence/Terry – Equivalent Irish: Turlough (pronounced "Tur-lock")
  • English: James – Equivalent Irish: Séamus (pronounced "Shay-mus") - often Shay for short.
  • English: Daniel – Equivalent Irish: Domhnall/Dónal (pronounced "Dough-nal"). This also gives us the surnames McDonnell and O’Donnell. Think of "Daniel O’Donnell".
  • English: Timothy – Equivalent Irish: Tadhg (pronounced "tie-g").
  • English: Denis – Equivalent Irish: Donnchadha (pronounced "Dunn-a-ka").
  • English: Edward – Equivalent Irish: Eamon (pronounced "aim-on").
  • English: Dermot/Jeremiah – Equivalent Irish: Diarmuid (pronounced "dear-mid").
June 6, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Search digital newspapers at Elephind
Interested in your family history?
Looking for news stories covering historic events?
Researching commentary or events?

Elephind.com makes it possible to search the world's digital newspapers from one place and at one time, allowing you to simultaneously search across thousands of articles using key words and phrases. For free!

The following explanation comes from the Elephind website:

With Elephind.com it’s possible for family historians, genealogists, and researchers to search historic digitized newspaper archives from around the globe. Elephind.com is much like Google, Bing, or other search engines but is focused on only historical, digitized newspapers. It enables you to search across many newspaper sites simultaneously, rather than having to visit each site separately. By clicking on the Elephind.com search result that interests you you'll go directly to the newspaper site which hosts that story.

Many of the smaller newspaper sites are not well known and may be difficult to find with the usual search engines but are searchable from Elephind.com.

We're continuing to add more newspapers to Elephind.com, so if at first you can't find what you're looking for, please check back later.

See what you can find here.
June 5, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Places, places, places
The study of family history revolves around places, which seems even more important for Irish genealogy.
 
Finding the townland where ancestors originated is our Holy Grail. Consequently we've blogged regularly over the years about researching Irish places. The topic is so critical, it's always worthy of review..
 
Sheilagh Doerfler recently posted in Vita Brevis--A Resource for family history from AmericanAncestors.org, about two valuable websites: The Placenames Database of Ireland (Logainm.ie) and Townlands.ie. She describes the many ways these sources can be helpful. 
 
Brush up by reading Ms. Doerfler's excellent explanation here.
June 2, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Free newspaper access at Findmypast
Findmypast is celebrating Queen Elizabeth II's Platinum Jubilee by offering free access to their newspaper collection through Monday, June 6, 7 pm (CDT).
 
Behind every news story, there’s a family story, including the Queen’s and your own.
Read all about them for free.
 
Irish newspapers provide color and depth to our stories, whether specific details about an ancestor or information about events of the day.
 
Here's the link to get started. If you don't already have a Findmypast account, you'll need to sign up with your name, email address and a password.
May 30, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Spring 2022 Irish Lives Remembered
The 56th issue (Spring 2022) of Irish Lives Remembered is available! Here's their announcement:
 
Thank you for your patience on this issue - we're delighted to announce that this is the first issue with our new Editor for Irish Lives Remembered, Brigit McCone.

This issue offers a wealth of articles on Irish lives, recent and distant, and a trove of genealogy tips to help you with your research.

Articles:
* Fiona Fitzsimons – Maureen the Scarlet-haired O'Hara's Roots!
* Brigit McCone – The Celt and the Cossack: Connecting Irish and Ukrainian Nationalism
* Eamonn P. Kelly – Imbolg: Brigid and the Rites of Spring
* Nathan Mannion – Playing the World: Gaelic Games Abroad
* Paul MacCotter – The Cotter (or MacCotter) Family of County Cork
* Brian Mitchell – Derry~Londonderry: Emigration from the Foyle by sail and steam
* Gerard Leen – The Surprisingly Political History of Cahersiveen, County Kerry
* Katharine Simms – The Standing Council of Irish Chiefs and Clans of Ireland Prize in History 2022
* The Four Courts Press Book  Excerpt – Roscommon:The Irish Revolution 1912-23 (published 2021) by John Burke
* The Genealogical Publishing Company Book  Excerpt – Irish Relatives and Friends: From “Information Wanted” Ads in the Irish-American 1850-1871, (published 2001) compiled by Laura Murphy DeGrazia and Diane Fitzpatrick Haberstroh
* The Four Courts Press Book Excerpt - Crime and punishment in nineteenth-century Belfast: the story of John Linn (published 2020) by Jonathan Jeffrey Wright
 
Regular columns:
* Dear Genie (Our Genealogists help you with your research block)
* Photodetective (Jayne Shrimpton analyses one of your family photos)
* FMP Roundup (Jessie O’Hara lets us know of the new Irish genealogy records that have been added to Findmypast)
 
Read Issue 56 here
 
May 28, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
'Tis time to study the Emerald Isle
As green growth surrounds us, it's time to study and celebrate Irish history and culture with IGSI!
 
The IGSI Education Team brings you the following details about a series of webinars on Irish culture and history, for veteran and novice researchers alike...AND some free offerings for IGSI members.
 
June 4 – The Power of Names in Irish Family History with David Ouimette of FamilySearch
10:30am – Noon CST (UTC-05:00), non-members register for $20 HERE 
or join IGSI for a discount
 
Names are the most powerful means of identifying ancestors. This presentation will illustrate three name-based techniques for tracing Irish ancestors: name-variant research, cluster genealogy, and surname heat maps.
  • Name-variant research uncovers the numerous ways your Irish ancestral surnames and given names appear in original documents and indexes, thus helping you discover more family records.
  • Cluster genealogy focuses on researching extended family and Irish neighbors who may have the same origins as your illusive immigrant ancestors.
  • Surname heat maps leverage the idea that your Irish ancestors and their surnames were likely tied to specific parishes over several generations; creating "heat maps" for multiple surnames reveals where the family names were co-located in Ireland.
All three of these techniques capitalize on the power of names in Irish family history.

David Ouimette, CG, manages Content Strategy at FamilySearch, prioritizing records of genealogical value for digital preservation and online publication... on a worldwide scope. David has researched in hundreds of archives in over sixty countries spanning all continents. A Trustee for the Board for Certification of Genealogists and former board member of the National Genealogical Society, he authored Finding Your Irish Ancestors: A Beginner’s Guide.
 
July 16 - An Overview of Irish History with Dr. Paul MacCotter
10:30 AM - Noon  CDT (UTC-5), non-members register for $20 HERE 
or join IGSI for a discount
 
Historians estimate that Ireland was first settled by humans about 10,000 years ago. To our knowledge no one has traced their ancestors back that far but…wouldn’t you like to know what was happening in Ireland when your ancestors did live there? Join us as Dr. MacCotter takes us on an overview journey through Irish history. He touches briefly on all the key issues, challenging the many myths and legends and replacing them with the true picture of who are the Irish and what is their history.

Dr. MacCotter (MA, PhD, MAGI) teaches genealogy, family history and medieval history at University College Cork, He is a member of Accredited Genealogists Ireland (MAGI). Since 1993 he has published widely in the fields of genealogy, family history and several branches of Irish medieval history. He has won prestigious research awards, has written four books and nearly sixty journal articles. He also has contributed to several family history and genealogy magazines.
 
August 6 - An Irish Farm History with Chris Paton
10:30 AM - Noon  CDT (UTC-5), non-members register for $20 HERE 
or join IGSI for a discount
 
Genealogist Chris Paton will draw together many archival resources to tell the story of an Irish family and their farm in County Kilkenny across the 19th and 20th centuries. Using an array of resources (vital records, newspapers, land records, census and military records) he tells the genealogical narrative of a family from the 1820s to the mid-20th century. Along the way he will take the story of the family and property from its humblest agricultural beginnings to a dramatic episode of the Irish Civil War, and beyond.
 
Originally from Northern Ireland, Chris is now based in Scotland. He holds a Postgraduate Diploma in Genealogical Studies from the University of Strathclyde and is an author of many family history books, including Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), Sharing Your Family History Online, and his latest, Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records. Chris is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists, tutors courses through Pharos Teaching and Tutoring Ltd, and is a regular contributor to several UK genealogy magazines, and his own Scottish GENES blog.
 
All you need to attend the webinars is an internet-connected device with audio capabilities (computer, iPad, smartphone, etc.)  For more information and to register, check out the IGSI Activities at left.
 
Unable to attend the live presentation? If you register in advance we will send you a link to the recording and handout a few days following the program for on-demand viewing at your convenience.
May 24, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Distribution of 1901/1911 surnames
Barry Griffin posted this today in the Facebook group "Irish Genealogy":
 
I map all the surnames for the 1901 and 1911 Irish census. I have now also added maps for each surname showing the distribution for Catholics, Presbyterians and Anglicans. People of Native-Irish and Norman-Irish extraction tend to be Catholic, Scots-Irish (Ulster-Scots) are typically Presbyterian or Anglican, and Anglo-Irish are usually Anglican.
 
Click here to link to Griffin's website.
May 22, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Irish Census Time Capsule
I've been so focused on the release of the 1950 U.S. Census that I totally missed the stories about Ireland's 2022 census, which was conducted on April 3.
 
Ireland's census is taken every five years, twice as often as in the U.S. Under normal circumstances, the Irish headcount would have occurred in 2021 but had to be delayed a year because of the pandemic.
 
At the end of the 2022 Irish Census household form was a space to leave a handwritten message or drawing for descendants or future generations or historians. It was called a Time Capsule, and making an entry was completely voluntary.
 
The entire census document will be sealed until 2122 so the messages will remain private for 100 years. More intriguing than names and ages on a census, the Time Capsule actively captures one's imagination. What insights will future generations get when they read these comments? What will they learn about life in 2022?
 
What would you write if you had the opportunity?
May 19, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Register now for Celtic Connections 2022
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Registration is open for the Celtic Connections Conference 2022. The focus of the conference is Irish, Scots-Irish, Scottish and Welsh Genealogy and Research Topics.
 
Mark your calendars! CCC 2022 begins July 9, 2022 and ends September 30, 2022.
 
More details:
  • 22 international and national speakers will deliver 49 pre-recorded talks
  • Talks will be available 24/7 for almost three months
  • 21 live chats over the course of the three months
  • At least three other small group meetings
  • $99 for full conference
  • One-year free TIARA membership for new members
Here are the Conference Tracks:
  • Researching the Celtic Diaspora
  • Emigration and Immigration Patterns
  • Unique Research Resources
  • DNA
  • Methodologies
  • Case Studies
VIsit the conference website for more information and to register.
 
May 15, 2022 By: IGSI Blogger
Gretna Green marriage records
Gretna Green is a parish in southern Scotland, on the Scottish side of the border between England and Scotland. Why, you might be asking, should that matter to me as I search for a marriage record?
 
When the English Clandestine Marriage Act was passed in the 1800s, English couples eloped across the border to Gretna Green to marry. When a couple runs away from where they reside to marry in a place with fewer marriage restrictions, those places have come to be called "Gretna Greens." There could be any number of reasons--maybe the area allows marriage at a younger age, or a shorter waiitng period, or no requirement for blood tests or parental consent, or the couple wants the marriage to be a secret.
 
If you've had trouble finding an official marriage record, look for a local Gretna Green. Here are a few such places:
Las Vegas and Reno, Nevada
For northern Illinois--Dubuque, Iowa
For the state of New Jersey and New York City--Elkton, Maryland
For Mobile, Alabama-- Lucedale, George County, Mississippi
For northern Utah--Evanston, Wyoming or Preston, Idaho
For North/South Carolina--Clayton, Raybun County, Georgia
For northern Washington state--Coeur d'Alene, Idaho
For eastern Oregon--Weiser, Idaho
 
By no means is that an exhaustive list. More valuable information can be found on Family Search about Gretna Greens in the U.S.